[ad_1]

All you need to tone your body and strength­en or build mus­cle is a pair of good dumb­bells. And Med­AboutMe lists the top 10 exer­cis­es.

Hard life, or why lift weights?

Strength train­ing is designed to build the per­fect body, add strength, speed and endurance, get rid of excess weight and pro­mote mus­cle build­ing. In addi­tion, reg­u­lar exer­cise helps main­tain peace of mind, relieve stress and even relieve chron­ic fatigue.

And recent stud­ies by experts Iowa State Uni­ver­si­tyshowed that dumb­bell train­ing could save your life. Accord­ing to sci­en­tists, lift­ing weights for a total of about an hour a week reduces the risk of devel­op­ing a heart attack or stroke by 40–70%!

“At the same time, dumb­bells do not require a lot of space. They can be used to per­form a wide range of exer­cis­es, includ­ing strength and coor­di­na­tion class­es, says a per­son­al fit­ness train­er. Rene Peel. — Dumb­bells will eas­i­ly fit into exer­cis­es with your own body weight. This will make train­ing more effec­tive in terms of increas­ing strength and strength­en­ing mus­cles.”

Did you know?

Reg­u­lar exer­cise and prop­er diet are effec­tive mea­sures to pre­vent dia­betes.

Hard choice: how to choose dumbbells

There are two types of dumb­bells on sale: col­lapsi­ble and non-col­lapsi­ble. For those who plan to play sports reg­u­lar­ly, with an increase in phys­i­cal activ­i­ty, it is bet­ter to opt for col­lapsi­ble equip­ment. Such dumb­bells con­sist of a lead and pan­cakes of var­i­ous weights.

Accord­ing to fit­ness train­ers, to work out the shoul­ders, biceps and tri­ceps, shells weigh­ing up to 5 kilo­grams are required (depend­ing on the lev­el of train­ing). To per­form dead­lifts, squats and lunges, you need dumb­bells weigh­ing 15–50 kilo­grams.

On a note!

Only 10% of those who lose weight man­age to lose weight through diet. 90% addi­tion­al­ly require thought­ful phys­i­cal activ­i­ty.

Rules of the game: how to train correctly

Dur­ing train­ing, do 8–10 rep­e­ti­tions of the exer­cis­es below. Rest for 30 sec­onds between exer­cis­es is allowed. If the phys­i­cal form allows, do a fit­ness ses­sion in 2–3 sets. Between sets it is allowed to take a break of 30–90 sec­onds.

Top 10 Best Strength Exer­cis­es

Exercise 1​

Exercise 1​

Stand with your feet hip-width apart, toes point­ing out to the sides. Grasp one end of the dumb­bell with both hands, low­er your hands down. On the count of times, squat deeply, hold­ing the dumb­bell in your hands, on the count of two, return to the start­ing posi­tion.

“Such squats Ide­al for ath­letes of all skill lev­els. They work out the gluteal mus­cles while improv­ing the mobil­i­ty of the hips, ”says the fit­ness train­er Ollie Frost.

Exercise 2​

Exercise 2​

Lunges are a great exer­cise that works your calves, low­er back, and abs. Addi­tion­al weight increas­es the effi­cien­cy of the load and allows you to achieve faster results.

Stand up straight, take dumb­bells in your hands. Low­er your arms along the body. On the count of times, lunge for­ward with your right foot, while touch­ing the floor with your left knee. Please note that the knees of both legs should form a right angle. On the count of two, return to the start­ing posi­tion. Repeat sev­er­al times, then switch legs.

Exercise 3​

Exercise 3​

This exer­cise tar­gets the glutes, calves, biceps, and quadri­ceps.

Stand up straight, put your feet shoul­der-width apart. The dumb­bells are on the floor in front of you. On the count of times, do a squat, take dumb­bells in each hand with a direct grip and slow­ly straight­en your legs to stand up. On a count of two, raise the dumb­bells to your shoul­ders while doing a semi-squat and imme­di­ate­ly ris­ing. When lift­ing shells, the wrists must be turned so that they are fac­ing you.

By the way!

The human body takes 6 to 8 weeks to get used to an exer­cise pro­gram, accord­ing to experts. The Amer­i­can Coun­cil on exer­cise.

Exercise 4​

Exercise 4​

Dur­ing this exer­cise, the fore­arms, shoul­ders and biceps, the erec­tors of the spine, as well as the ham­strings and but­tocks are loaded.

Stand straight, feet shoul­der width apart. Lean for­ward so that your back and body form a right angle, bend your legs slight­ly at the knees. Take dumb­bells in your hands (straight grip) and raise them to the lev­el of the hips, bend­ing your arms at the elbows. Keep in mind that the back should remain straight dur­ing the exer­cise.

Exercise 5​

Exercise 5​

This seem­ing­ly easy exer­cise works the upper back, shoul­ders, tri­ceps and biceps, fore­arms, abs, glutes, ham­strings, quads, calves.

Free up space for maneu­vers 3–4 meters long. Take dumb­bells, place your low­ered arms with weights along the body. Move in short steps from one end of the straight to the oth­er, and vice ver­sa. An impor­tant con­di­tion for the exer­cise is high speed of move­ment.

Exercise 6​

Exercise 6​

Stand straight, feet nar­row­er than shoul­der width. Take dumb­bells in your hands. On the count of one, tilt down, low­er­ing your arms with dumb­bells almost to the floor, on the count of two, return to the start­ing posi­tion. The back should always remain straight, round­ing is unac­cept­able.

By the way!

Researchers from Uni­ver­si­ty of Flori­da found that peo­ple who changed their train­ing pro­gram every 2 weeks were more moti­vat­ed and sat­is­fied with their progress.

Exercise 7​

Exercise 7​

This is one of the favorite exer­cis­es for both begin­ners and advanced ath­letes. It per­fect­ly works out the pec­toral and rhom­boid mus­cles, tri­ceps, shoul­ders and fore­arms.

Lie down on a flat sur­face, hold­ing two dumb­bells in your hands with an over­hand grip. On the count of times, raise your hands with dumb­bells up, on the count of two, low­er them to chest lev­el.

Exercise 8​

Exercise 8​

This dynam­ic exer­cise tar­gets the glutes and ham­strings, abs, shoul­ders, and quadri­ceps femoris.

Stand straight, feet wider than shoul­der width apart. Take a dumb­bell in your right hand. On the count of times, bend­ing your knees, put the dumb­bell between your legs, on the count of two, straight­en your legs and lift the dumb­bell over your head with a sharp swing. Make sure that you are doing the exer­cise cor­rect­ly: the pro­jec­tile should describe a semi­cir­cle. Repeat the exer­cise, giv­ing the load to the oth­er hand.

Exercise 9​

Exercise 9​

To per­form this exer­cise, you will need a sta­ble leg sup­port: a bench, plat­form or cross­fit stand. When per­formed reg­u­lar­ly, you can count on improv­ing body coor­di­na­tion and pro­tec­tion from acci­den­tal injury when lift­ing or car­ry­ing heavy loads.

Place your right foot on the plat­form, then rise up and put your left foot on it. Get down in reverse order. Dur­ing the exer­cise, you should have dumb­bells in your hands.

On a note!

Reg­u­lar strength train­ing increas­es the num­ber of calo­ries the body burns dur­ing nor­mal activ­i­ties and at rest.

Exercise 10​

Exercise 10​

The work­out will be com­plet­ed with a sim­ple exer­cise that loads the calf mus­cles, improves the sta­bil­i­ty and mobil­i­ty of the ankles.

Stand straight, feet nar­row­er than shoul­der width. Place your hands with dumb­bells clamped in them along the body. Place a low step or weight plate under the balls of your feet. The heels should remain on the floor. On the count of times, lift your heels off the floor and, strain­ing your calves, rise up, on the count of two, return to the start­ing posi­tion.

Expert com­ment

Igor Piskunov, mas­ter of sports in pow­er­lift­ing, fit­ness train­er, mem­ber of the Asso­ci­a­tion of Fit­ness Pro­fes­sion­als

Dumb­bells are a sim­ple, com­pact and inex­pen­sive tool, per­fect for exer­cis­ing in any con­di­tions. Their main advan­tages are the abil­i­ty to change the load, as well as the sym­me­try of the load.

The most effec­tive exer­cis­es for home, I think:

1. Lunges in place. The quadri­ceps, biceps, calves, abs, and back exten­sors are active­ly involved here. Also, this exer­cise sig­nif­i­cant­ly rais­es testos­terone lev­els in men.

2. Dumb­bell row in an incline with one hand alter­nate­ly. The latis­simus dor­si, teres major and minor, pos­te­ri­or del­toid, trapez­ius and biceps work.

3. Dumb­bell bench press from the floor or from the bench. The load is giv­en to the pec­toralis major and minor mus­cles, tri­ceps, ante­ri­or delta.

As you can see, these exer­cis­es engage a large num­ber of mus­cles at once, and this, in turn, increas­es testos­terone lev­els, increas­es calo­rie expen­di­ture and, in gen­er­al, pro­vides a sig­nif­i­cant incen­tive for mus­cle growth and a change in body com­po­si­tion for the bet­ter.

Of course, there are a lot of exer­cis­es. But these are basic, and there­fore the most impor­tant.

От Yraa

Добавить комментарий