Foods with the highest content of B vitamins

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Vit­a­mins and vit­a­min-like sub­stances that make up group B can be obtained from func­tion­al foods of ani­mal and veg­etable ori­gin, which are quite acces­si­ble to Rus­sians. All of them work not only indi­vid­u­al­ly, but also col­lec­tive­ly, pro­vid­ing impor­tant func­tions of the body, includ­ing the process­es of releas­ing ener­gy from essen­tial nutri­ents.

Some foods are par­tic­u­lar­ly valu­able sources of only one ele­ment of this group, while oth­ers con­tain all or many of the B vit­a­mins. For­tu­nate­ly, they are part of fair­ly com­mon foods that make up the usu­al diet of peo­ple. So, if a per­son eats a var­ied, bal­anced diet that includes foods from all food groups, then most like­ly they are not defi­cient in these nutri­ents.

Find out which foods are high in B vit­a­mins.

Where is thiamine (vitamin B1) hidden?

Where is thiamine (vitamin B1) hidden?

It has sev­er­al impor­tant fea­tures, includ­ing:

    together with other vitamins of this group, it provides the processes of converting and releasing energy from food, providing, first of all, protein metabolism;
    supports the health of the nervous system;
    involved in the transfer of genetic information.

Good sources of this nutri­ent are:

    green peas;
    pecan;
    lentils;
    almond;
    dark green leafy vegetables;
    eggs;
    wheat germ oil;
    whole grain breads;
    pork;
    buckwheat, oatmeal and some other whole grains;
    liver.

Thi­amine can­not be stored in the human body, so it must be includ­ed in the diet every day. A small amount is pro­duced by bac­te­ria that make up the gut micro­bio­me. The rec­om­mend­ed dai­ly dose, which must be obtained with food, for adults in Rus­sia is about 1.7 mg.

What foods contain riboflavin (B2)?

Among the main func­tions of this nutri­ent:

    participation in the synthesis of red blood cells;
    maintaining the health of the skin;
    prevention of visual impairment;
    strengthening the nervous system;
    ensuring the synthesis of red blood cells;
    regulation of blood pressure;
    participation in the release of energy from food.

Good food sources of riboflavin are:

    milk, cheese, yogurt and other dairy products;
    White cabbage;
    broccoli;
    spinach, asparagus, and other dark green leafy vegetables;
    fish;
    eggs;
    chicken;
    rice;
    kidneys;
    mushrooms;
    buckwheat;
    liver, etc.

UV radi­a­tion can destroy riboflavin, so ide­al­ly all foods that make up the diet should be stored away from direct sun­light. Although this sub­stance is par­tial­ly syn­the­sized by the microflo­ra of the large intes­tine, it does not accu­mu­late in the body, there­fore, accord­ing to the rec­om­men­da­tions of Russ­ian doc­tors, about 2 mg of riboflavin should be present in the diet of adults every day.

Where can I find niacin (B3, nicotinic acid or vitamin PP)?

Nico­tinic acid has sev­er­al impor­tant func­tions, includ­ing:

    provides over 50 fermentation reactions;
    helps release energy from food;
    participates in the production of hormones;
    serves to prevent cardiopathologies;
    maintains the health of the nervous system;
    maintains good skin condition.

Valu­able food sources of niacin are:

    turkey, chicken, other types of meat;
    salmon, tuna and other fish;
    peanut;
    buckwheat;
    legumes;
    mushrooms;
    eggs;
    milk.

Although B3 is par­tial­ly syn­the­sized by the human body from tryp­to­phan, it also does not accu­mu­late, so adults are rec­om­mend­ed to con­sume about 20 mg of niacin dai­ly. Defi­cien­cy is com­mon in patients with:

    peptic ulcer of the stomach;
    gastritis;
    pathologies of the liver;
    disorders in the thyroid gland;
    cholecystitis, etc.

You should not get car­ried away with nutri­tion­al sup­ple­ments with nico­tinic acid, as long-term over­dose can lead to skin and liv­er dam­age. There­fore, it is prefer­able to obtain niacin from the nor­mal diet.

What is pantothenic acid (panthenol or B5)?

This nutri­ent has sev­er­al func­tions in the human body:

    it helps to release and convert energy from food;
    participates in the synthesis of coenzyme A;
    promotes regeneration;
    provides production of antibodies;
    necessary for the production of acetylcholine, indispensable for the well-being of the nervous system;
    protects against the effects of stress by regulating the production of cortisone;
    required for the production of red blood cells.

Pan­tothenic acid is found in almost all meat and veg­etable prod­ucts, includ­ing:

    chicken
    beef;
    potatoes;
    tomatoes;
    asparagus;
    kidneys;
    eggs;
    broccoli, etc.

Pan­thenol con­tains legumes and whole grains such as:

    brown rice;
    wholemeal bread;
    kinoa, etc.

Although the micro­bio­me pro­duces some pan­thenol, a per­son should con­sume about 5 mg of this sub­stance with a dai­ly diet.

How to enrich the diet with vitamin B6 or pyridoxine?

How to enrich the diet with vitamin B6 or pyridoxine?

Among the impor­tant func­tions of this sub­stance in the human body:

    participation in the transformation and accumulation of energy;
    production of hemoglobin;
    it is necessary for the synthesis of prostaglandins, indispensable for the well-being of the circulatory system;
    important for immunity, as it is involved in the production of antibodies;
    without it, it is impossible to produce dopamine, serotonin, noadrenaline, which are necessary for the functioning of the central nervous system and the performance of cognitive functions, etc.

Good food sources of B6:

    pork;
    poultry meat (for example, chicken or turkey);
    fish;
    whole wheat bread;
    wheat germ, oatmeal, quinoa, brown rice and other whole grains;
    eggs;
    bananas;
    seafood;
    spinach and other dark green leafy vegetables;
    soya beans;
    peanut;
    milk;
    potato.

Like oth­er vit­a­mins of this group, pyri­dox­ine is par­tial­ly syn­the­sized in the human body with the help of bac­te­ria, but is not stored by the body for future use, so about 2 mg should be con­sumed dai­ly with food. You should con­sult your doc­tor before tak­ing pyri­dox­ine sup­ple­ments, as pro­longed over­dose can lead to loss of sen­sa­tion in the arms and legs (periph­er­al neu­ropa­thy). Typ­i­cal­ly, symp­toms are reversible and dis­ap­pear when a per­son stops tak­ing B6 sup­ple­ments.

What foods are rich in biotin (vitamin B7 or H)?

It is essen­tial for the body:

    is an activator of digestive enzymes;
    serves as a key factor in the successful metabolism of fats;
    provides prevention of diabetes mellitus (1 and 2 types);
    protects the health of the skin and its appendages.

Bac­te­ria that inhab­it the human intestines are capa­ble of pro­duc­ing biotin, but it is rec­om­mend­ed to take up to 50 mg of B7 with food dai­ly.

Biotin occurs nat­u­ral­ly in a wide range of foods, but is at very low lev­els com­pared to oth­er water-sol­u­ble vit­a­mins. The best sources of this nutri­ent are:

    Brewer’s yeast;
    kidneys;
    peanut;
    liver;
    nuts;
    cauliflower;
    mushrooms;
    eggs, etc.

What contains folate (folic acid, folacin, vitamin B9 or M)?

Folic acid is one of the B‑group vit­a­mins par­tial­ly syn­the­sized by the micro­bio­me. But unlike oth­er nutri­ents in this group, B9 is deposit­ed in the liv­er cells.

Folic acid has sev­er­al impor­tant func­tions:

    works together with vitamin B12 to form healthy red blood cells;
    participates in protein metabolism;
    helps reduce the risk of defects in the central nervous system in the fetus;
    ensures the production of leukocytes;
    necessary for the production of serotonin, dopamine and the functioning of the central nervous system.

A lack of folic acid can lead to a type of mega­loblas­tic ane­mia, folic acid defi­cien­cy.

Folic acid is found in small amounts in many foods. Good sources of folate are:

    broccoli;
    Brussels sprouts;
    liver;
    spinach;
    asparagus;
    peas;
    chickpeas;
    whole grain breads, etc.

Dos­es may vary.

    Adults should consume about 0.4 mg of folic acid per day.
    Pregnant women are advised to take an additional 0.4 mg of folic acid until the 12th week of pregnancy. This should help prevent birth defects of the baby’s central nervous system, such as spina bifida.
    If there is a family history of conditions such as spina bifida, neural tube defects, a doctor may recommend taking a higher dose, up to 5 mg of folic acid each day, until the 12th week of pregnancy.
    Women with diabetes and those taking antiepileptic drugs should seek medical advice before taking folic acid.
    A large dose of vitamin B9 may be required for older people, as the ability to synthesize and absorb this nutrient decreases with age.

How to prevent deficiency of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12)?

How to prevent deficiency of cyanocobalamin (vitamin B12)?

It per­forms sev­er­al impor­tant func­tions:

    involved in the production of red blood cells;
    supports the health of the nervous system, being a building material for the production of myelin;
    regulates cholesterol;
    protects the liver;
    is involved in the release of energy from food, being responsible for fat and protein metabolism.

Lack of vit­a­min B12, which is main­ly con­cen­trat­ed in the liv­er, can lead to ane­mia. Most often, veg­ans and veg­e­tar­i­ans suf­fer from its defi­cien­cy, since ani­mal prod­ucts are the only nat­ur­al source of this nutri­ent. These include:

    beef and other types of meat;
    salmon;
    shellfish;
    cod;
    mussels;
    milk;
    cheese;
    crabs;
    eggs.

Today, cere­als, break­fast cere­als and some oth­er plant foods for­ti­fied with vit­a­min B12 are pro­duced, espe­cial­ly use­ful for those who exclude ani­mal prod­ucts from the diet.

By Yraa

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