Thyroid Diet: 13 Foods High in Iodine

By Yraa #absence, #absorb, #absorption, #according, #acid, #acids, #add, #added, #adding, #additives, #adult, #affects, #against, #age, #almost, #amino, #amount, #amounts, #animal, #any, #appear, #associated, #average, #baked, #balanced, #based, #beans, #beef, #been, #being, #believe, #benefits, #berries, #birth, #blueberries, #Body, #boiled, #both, #breast, #bring, #brought, #butter, #c, #calcium, #calorie, #canned, #carbohydrates, #careful, #cause, #century, #cereals, #certain, #cheeses, #chicken, #children, #cocktails, #cod, #combine, #combined, #come, #component, #concluded, #considered, #consume, #contain, #contained, #containing, #contains, #content, #contraindications, #cook, #corn, #correct, #corresponds, #cost, #cup, #d, #daily, #dairy, #damage, #dark, #decrease, #decreased, #deficiency, #depends, #develop, #development, #develops, #did, #diet, #dietary, #different, #difficult, #digestion, #disease, #diseases, #dishes, #disorders, #dried, #dry, #due, #e, #easily, #Easy, #eat, #eaten, #egg, #eggs, #element, #endocrinologist, #enough, #enriched, #equal, #essential, #etc, #every, #everyday, #example, #exception, #excess, #experienced, #expert, #experts, #extremely, #fact, #fats, #fatty, #feed, #fiber, #fish, #folic, #food, #foods, #formation, #found, #function, #functioning, #g, #garlic, #getting, #given, #gland, #Good, #grains, #grams, #great, #green, #group, #half, #hand, #hard, #health, #Healthy, #help, #her, #herbs, #high, #hips, #Home, #hormonal, #human, #idea, #ideal, #improve, #include, #increased, #ingredients, #insufficient, #intake, #introduce, #involved, #iron, #just, #know, #lack, #late, #lead, #leading, #leads, #leafy, #legumes, #levels, #little, #liver, #local, #long, #losing, #lot, #lower, #maintain, #materials, #meats, #medium, #menu, #milk, #mineral, #minerals, #minimal, #moreover, #mothers, #much, #must, #national, #note, #nursing, #nutrients, #nutritionist, #nutritious, #obesity, #observed, #obtained, #Oil, #oils, #old, #olive, #omega, #omega-3, #once, #optimal, #orange, #organ, #oxygen, #part, #people, #per, #perfectly, #phosphorus, #photo, #plays, #polyunsaturated, #poor, #population, #potassium, #potato, #potatoes, #poultry, #pregnancy, #preparation, #prepare, #present, #problems, #processed, #produce, #product, #production, #Products, #proper, #properties, #protect, #protein, #proteins, #proven, #provide, #provides, #prunes, #pure, #quality, #receive, #recommended, #red, #relief, #required, #result, #riboflavin, #rice, #rich, #right, #risk, #role, #rose, #said, #salad, #salads, #salmon, #salt, #scientists, #sea, #seafood, #seeds, #seek, #selenium, #Sensitive, #serious, #serve, #serving, #seven, #sex, #signs, #six, #slightly, #snack, #sodium, #some, #soups, #source, #sources, #still, #studies, #substance, #substances, #supplement, #synthesis, #synthesized, #t, #table, #taken, #taste, #tend, #therefore, #third, #those, #thus, #thyroid, #times, #today, #too, #trace, #treatment, #try, #tuna, #turkey, #Types, #understand, #used, #useful, #using, #valuable, #value, #values, #varied, #vegetable, #vegetarians, #versatile, #very, #violation, #vitamin, #vitamins, #want, #was, #Water, #way, #weighing, #weight, #were, #whether, #who, #whole, #why, #will, #woman, #Women, #world, #year, #yolk, #yolks, #zinc

Iodine is an essen­tial min­er­al that is essen­tial for the prop­er func­tion­ing of the thy­roid gland. If it is not enough in the body, seri­ous dis­eases devel­op. But they can be pre­vent­ed — if you enrich the menu with iodine. And just adding iodized salt to the menu is not enough!

Why does the body need iodine

As a pure ele­ment, iodine is a dark, shiny stone or pur­ple dye. It is found in trace amounts in soil and water, and is found in some foods.

Iodine is very impor­tant for the health of the thy­roid gland, as it plays a large role in the pro­duc­tion of hor­mones. Giv­en that the body does not pro­duce iodine on its own, it must be obtained from food.

Ade­quate amounts of this valu­able min­er­al in the diet have been proven to help improve metab­o­lism, brain health, and hor­mone lev­els. And its defi­cien­cy is fraught with the devel­op­ment of hypothy­roidism, brain dam­age, an increase in the thy­roid gland to abnor­mal sizes (goi­ter). And if a woman expe­ri­enced a lack of iodine dur­ing preg­nan­cy, her off­spring have an increased risk of con­gen­i­tal anom­alies.

On a note!

Accord­ing to Web­MD por­tal experts, almost a third of the world’s pop­u­la­tion has a high risk of iodine defi­cien­cy.

How much iodine is required daily

How much iodine is required daily

The rec­om­mend­ed dai­ly amount of iodine depends on the age and sex of the per­son. The aver­age val­ues ​​are:

    Children from birth to six months: 110 mcg.
    Children seven months to one year old: 130 mcg.
    Children 1 to 8 years old: 90 mcg.
    Children 9 to 13 years old: 120 mcg.
    Adolescents 14–18 years old: 150 mcg.
    Adults: 150 mcg.
    Women in position: 220 mcg.
    Nursing mothers: 290 mcg.

On a note!

Veg­ans and peo­ple who eat lit­tle dairy, seafood, and eggs tend to need more of the min­er­al, too.

13 Foods High in Iodine

For­tu­nate­ly, get­ting iodine from food is not dif­fi­cult. They are rich in many every­day prod­ucts.

1. Seaweed

Accord­ing to Nation­al Insti­tutes of health, con­sid­ered one of the best sources of iodine. A 10-gram serv­ing of dried nori sea­weed will enrich the body with 232 micro­grams of iodine, which is almost 1.5 times the dai­ly require­ment. Nori is used to make sushi and seafood sal­ads and more.

2. Fish

No won­der in the Sovi­et Union every Thurs­day was a fish day. This brought many ben­e­fits to human health. High-qual­i­ty fish is replete with use­ful­ness, con­tains Omega‑3 fat­ty acids, phos­pho­rus, riboflavin and vit­a­min D. It is also rich in iodine.

The most valu­able sources of iodine are cod, hal­ibut and pol­lock. On aver­age, cod con­tains 158 mcg of iodine per 100 g of prod­uct, pol­lock — 1210 mcg, and hal­ibut — 18 mcg.

3. Clams

3. Clams

Crabs, scal­lops, squid, shrimp, oys­ters and oth­er types of shell­fish con­tain pro­tein, vit­a­mins and healthy fats in addi­tion to iodine. With all this, they are a dietary prod­uct — their calo­rie con­tent is min­i­mal. Due to the fact that mol­lusks absorb sea water, they abound in iodine. For exam­ple, one serv­ing of boiled shrimp con­tains 13 micro­grams of iodine.

By the way!

Just 100 grams of boiled oys­ters can pro­vide 90 micro­grams of iodine, which is more than half the dai­ly require­ment for an adult.

4. Dairy products

The con­tent of iodine in dairy prod­ucts depends on whether the cows were giv­en feed addi­tives with a valu­able sub­stance. On aver­age, one cup of milk con­tains 85 micro­grams of iodine. In addi­tion to it, milk is a source of pro­tein, cal­ci­um, phos­pho­rus, vit­a­min D and group B.

Dairy prod­ucts in the absence of health con­traindi­ca­tions should be present in the diet dai­ly.

5. Eggs

Sci­en­tists have con­clud­ed that ani­mal prod­ucts are the rich­est sources of iodine. And eggs are no excep­tion. One hard boiled egg will pro­vide the body with 26 micro­grams of iodine. And besides this — iron, folic acid, riboflavin, vit­a­mins D and E, high-qual­i­ty pro­tein.

Eggs can be eat­en whole, or you can add them to sal­ads and first cours­es, pre­pare cock­tails based on them.

6. Iodized salt

Salt enriched with iodine is right­ful­ly con­sid­ered a healthy prod­uct. But there is also a down­side to it. When using it, you should be care­ful, as excess sodi­um in the diet can lead to health prob­lems.

In addi­tion, it is impor­tant to under­stand that most of the salt in the diet does not come from the salt shak­er, but from processed foods. And in its prepa­ra­tion, iodized salt is used very rarely. That’s why it’s not enough to have a salt shak­er with the “cor­rect” salt on the table to make up for an iodine defi­cien­cy.

Did you know?

Many con­sumers believe that for the first time they began to sat­u­rate salt with iodine in the USSR, but in fact, such an idea was first born in Switzer­land in 1922.

7. Potato

7. Potato

The best way to eat pota­toes to get iodine is baked. Many peo­ple under­es­ti­mate pota­toes, but mean­while, they are rich in vit­a­min C, potas­si­um and oth­er nutri­ents. One medi­um baked pota­to con­tains about 60 micro­grams of iodine.

If you want to increase the amount of iodine, pota­toes can be sprin­kled with a lit­tle cheese. It also con­tains iodine.

8. Turkey breast

The turkey is com­mon­ly asso­ci­at­ed with the fes­tive table at Christ­mas. But you should try to serve it more often on the din­ner table and on week­days. More­over, from her breast you can cook a lot of healthy, dietary dish­es.

In addi­tion to high-qual­i­ty pro­tein, sele­ni­um and B vit­a­mins, turkey con­tains a lot of iodine. So, in 100 g of the prod­uct there will be 40 mcg.

9. Prunes

Dried plums con­tain more nutri­ents per gram of weight since they are devoid of water. In addi­tion to being high in fiber, which is good for diges­tion and can pro­vide relief from con­sti­pa­tion, prunes con­tain iodine.

One serv­ing of 5 prunes will bring 13 micro­grams of the min­er­al to the body, which cor­re­sponds to 9% of the dai­ly require­ment.

On a note!

Prunes as a food prod­uct appeared as ear­ly as the 6th cen­tu­ry BC, when the Egyp­tians noticed that some fruits do not dete­ri­o­rate in the sun, but dry out, acquir­ing a dif­fer­ent taste and use­ful prop­er­ties.

10. Canned tuna

An 85 g can of canned tuna in oil con­tains 14 micro­grams of iodine, which cor­re­sponds to 11% of the dai­ly require­ment. That said, tuna is also a great source of pro­tein, omega‑3 fat­ty acids, and vit­a­min D. And it’s a great snack for those who come home from work late and don’t have time to cook din­ner. It is use­ful to include tuna in sal­ads, to sup­ple­ment cere­als with them.

11. Sea beans

11. Sea beans

All types of legumes are good for health. And sea beans are no excep­tion. It con­tains many vit­a­mins and min­er­als, includ­ing iodine. A cup-sized serv­ing of boiled navy beans pro­vides 30 micro­grams of iodine, which is slight­ly more than 20% of the dai­ly val­ue.

Beans are easy to add to your diet. It can be used as one of the sal­ad ingre­di­ents, as a fill­ing for pies and pies, added to soups and main dish­es.

12. Canned corn

It is often added to sal­ads, along with beans. It’s tasty, juicy, nutri­tious and ver­sa­tile. Many prod­ucts are per­fect­ly com­bined with it, and there­fore it is easy to intro­duce it into the dai­ly diet.

Half a cup of canned corn will pro­vide 14 micro­grams of iodine, which is equal to 10% of the dai­ly val­ue.

13. Meat by-products

Once they were con­sid­ered food for the poor, and today they are used to pre­pare dish­es wor­thy of the fes­tive table. There are many use­ful sub­stances in offal, and their cost is low­er than meat. A beef liv­er weigh­ing 70 grams will have 32 micro­grams of iodine.

Eat right, enrich the menu with prod­ucts with iodine and be healthy!

Expert com­ment

Olga Lush­niko­va, nutri­tion­ist

Olga Lushnikova, nutritionistFor opti­mal func­tion­ing of the thy­roid gland (like any oth­er organ), the body must receive all the nec­es­sary macronu­tri­ents (pro­teins, fats and car­bo­hy­drates) and micronu­tri­ents (vit­a­mins and min­er­als), but some of them should still be empha­sized.

It should be not­ed that the thy­roid gland is extreme­ly sen­si­tive to dras­tic calo­rie restric­tion. When los­ing weight, this fact must be tak­en into account. Any rigid diets can lead to changes in the func­tion­ing of the thy­roid gland, and as a result, hor­mon­al dis­or­ders.

On the oth­er hand, obe­si­ty can also cause a mal­func­tion of this impor­tant endocrine organ, lead­ing to hypothy­roidism (decreased pro­duc­tion of thy­roid hor­mones).

To main­tain thy­roid func­tion, you should increase your intake of cer­tain nutri­ents.

    Iodine. There are regions with insufficient content in soil, plants, water, which leads to damage to the thyroid gland in local residents. With insufficient intake of iodine in the body, endemic goiter with hypothyroidism develops. Food sources of iodine: cod liver, seaweed, any sea fish, squid, shrimp, egg yolk; legumes, milk, persimmon, blueberries, feijoa.
    The amino acid tyrosine. It is an important component for the synthesis of thyroid hormones. Tyrosine is a non-essential amino acid, i. easily synthesized in the body. It is abundant in nuts, seeds, dairy, parmesan, fish, beef, chicken, and wild rice.
    Vitamin D. Regulates the functioning of the thyroid gland, its deficiency is associated with its autoimmune diseases, for example, Hashimoto’s disease. Vitamin sources: egg yolks, beef liver, fatty fish, fish roe, hard cheese, chanterelle mushrooms.
    Selenium. It is part of the important deiodinase enzyme involved in the formation of the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4). To get the required amount of selenium, you need to include fish (salmon, sardines, herring), Brazil nuts, chicken, turkey, garlic, eggs, mushrooms and other foods in your diet every day.
    Iron. The thyroid gland is very sensitive to insufficient oxygen (hypoxia), any anemia can disrupt its work. Therefore, it is important to consume foods containing iron: red meat, organ meats, seafood, legumes, green leafy vegetables, whole grains. For optimal absorption of iron, it is necessary to include both vegetable and animal sources in the diet, combine it with vitamin C (berries, herbs, rose hips, pomegranate, etc.) and B vitamins.
    Vitamin B12. Deficiency anemia also affects the functioning of the thyroid gland, leading to a decrease in hormone production and, as a result, a decrease in its function. Vitamin B12 deficiency is often observed in vegetarians, because the main sources of this vitamin are animal products: meat, fish, poultry, offal, seafood, hard cheeses.

In addi­tion, for opti­mal thy­roid func­tion, you need:

    Zinc. Contained in seafood, oysters, liver, chicken, cheese.
    Vitamin A (retinol). Its sources are liver, eggs, butter, meat, poultry, cheese; orange vegetables and fruits, green leafy vegetables.
    Omega‑3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. They contain any fatty sea fish, fish caviar, olive, hemp and other oils, flax and chia seeds.

Thus, a var­ied, bal­anced diet will help main­tain thy­roid health for a long time.

If any signs of a vio­la­tion of its work appear, you need to seek help from an endocri­nol­o­gist who will pre­scribe the nec­es­sary stud­ies and treat­ment if nec­es­sary.

Shut­ter­stock pho­to mate­ri­als used

Is There an Ide­al Diet to Pro­tect against Iodine Defi­cien­cy? / Krela-Kaźmier­czak I., Czarny­wo­jtek A., Sko­rac­ka K. // Nutri­ents - 2021

food, cooking, herbs
cake, chocolate, cupcake
cupcake, cake, dessert
apple, fruit, food
food, donuts, sweet

By Yraa

Leave a Reply