7 myths about sleep: what is true and what is fiction?

By Yraa #able, #activity, #actually, #aged, #alarm, #alcohol, #alcoholic, #alert, #anything, #arises, #arms, #asked, #asleep, #associated, #awake, #awakening, #bad, #bed, #believe, #believed, #beverages, #Body, #both, #breathing, #calm, #carb, #cases, #cause, #causes, #center, #clock, #cognitive, #collected, #compared, #complete, #complex, #complicated, #consult, #containing, #continue, #contribute, #could, #current, #cycle, #cycles, #dairy, #daytime, #deep, #deprivation, #determines, #did, #diet, #difficult, #difficulty, #diseases, #disorder, #doctors, #dream, #dreams, #drug, #due, #each, #easily, #eating, #effect, #effective, #enough, #especially, #even, #every, #example, #experience, #expert, #fact, #facts, #failure, #fall, #falling, #fast, #faster, #feel, #feeling, #find, #five, #followed, #foods, #forget, #forward, #found, #four, #frequent, #function, #functions, #glass, #go, #going, #Good, #gray, #group, #habits, #harder, #he, #head, #health, #heartburn, #help, #Helps, #high, #however, #includes, #indicated, #indicates, #insomnia, #interesting, #interfere, #issue, #journal, #just, #know, #lack, #learned, #least, #less, #let, #likely, #little, #lives, #long, #look, #lot, #matter, #meal, #Medical, #medication, #melatonin, #middle, #moment, #morpheus, #much, #myth, #myths, #national, #never, #new, #night, #note, #observing, #occurs, #off, #older, #opportunity, #otherwise, #our, #part, #people, #performed, #phase, #phenomenon, #piece, #pillow, #population, #practice, #presented, #press, #prevent, #previous, #product, #production, #published, #reasons, #refreshed, #rem, #remember, #repeated, #repeating, #research, #researchers, #rest, #result, #results, #reviews, #right, #say, #says, #scientists, #second, #Secret, #secrets, #seems, #selected, #serotonin, #several, #show, #showed, #shows, #sign, #signal, #similar, #six, #sleep, #Sleeping, #sleepy, #slept, #some, #something, #soon, #sound, #soundly, #specialists, #specific, #spend, #statistics, #stay, #still, #stops, #strength, #study, #suppress, #sure, #symptoms, #synthesize, #take, #talk, #term, #tests, #theory, #therapy, #therefore, #thinking, #third, #those, #three, #throughout, #times, #too, #touching, #treatment, #true, #tryptophan, #turn, #turned, #turns, #two, #typical, #university, #us, #very, #wake, #wakefulness, #waking, #was, #waves, #weakness, #week, #weekend, #whether, #while, #White, #who, #why, #will, #wine, #Women, #works, #world, #worse, #worth

Despite the fact that doc­tors and sci­en­tists know so much about sleep, we still have not learned how to fall asleep eas­i­ly, sleep sound­ly through the night, and wake up refreshed and active in the morn­ing. World sta­tis­tics show that insom­nia occurs in 28–45% of the world’s pop­u­la­tion.

Sur­pris­ing­ly, but true: in some cas­es, myths about sleep, which we still con­tin­ue to believe, are to blame.

Myth 1: More sleep is better for health

Myth 1: More sleep is better for health

Let’s talk frankly! Who among us does not take the oppor­tu­ni­ty to sleep off the week­end? Many look for­ward to the week­end to catch up on the week and regain strength. But it turns out that too much sleep is just as bad for health as not enough. This was demon­strat­ed by a study by Har­vard sci­en­tists pub­lished in Jour­nal of the Amer­i­can Geri­atrics Soci­ety.

Researchers asked 15,000 women aged 70 and over about their sleep habits. Over the course of six years, they mon­i­tored their night­time sleep per­for­mance three times, and also test­ed their cog­ni­tive func­tion through test­ing. As a result, it turned out that those who slept very lit­tle (5 hours or less) or very much (9 hours or more) show the worst results in mem­o­ry and think­ing tests. But the scary part is that both sleep-deprived and over-sleep­ing peo­ple showed cog­ni­tive decline that is typ­i­cal of peo­ple who are two years old­er!

Myth 2: A little alcohol can help you sleep.

“A glass of wine before bed is the best sleep­ing pill!” Some peo­ple mis­tak­en­ly believe. Research shows the oppo­site effect! While alco­holic bev­er­ages can indeed make you sleepy and make you go to bed faster, they are also sure to cause night­time awak­en­ings. A per­son will wake up sev­er­al times dur­ing the night and even­tu­al­ly will not be able to even rest in the slight­est.

Myth 3: During sleep, the brain “turns off”

For­tu­nate­ly for our­selves nev­er stops its work, oth­er­wise such bod­i­ly func­tions as, for exam­ple, breath­ing, could not be per­formed at night. Inter­est­ing­ly, dur­ing REM sleep, when peo­ple usu­al­ly dream, the brain works the hard­est: the activ­i­ty of brain waves is sim­i­lar to the activ­i­ty dur­ing wake­ful­ness.

Despite this, a sleep­ing per­son is most dif­fi­cult to wake up at this very moment. There­fore, sci­en­tists often call REM sleep para­dox­i­cal.

On a note!

While we sleep, our white and gray mat­ter has some­thing to do. As soon as we fall asleep, our brain cycles through three stages of non-REM sleep, fol­lowed by one REM. At each of these stages, the brain dis­plays spe­cif­ic brain wave pat­terns and neur­al activ­i­ty.

This cycle of four stages is repeat­ed five or six times dur­ing the night.

Myth 4: Difficulty falling asleep indicates insomnia

Myth 4: Difficulty falling asleep indicates insomnia

Insom­nia is actu­al­ly a com­plex sleep dis­or­der. And dif­fi­cul­ty falling asleep is just one of its symp­toms. Spe­cial­ists Nation­al Sleep Foun­da­tion they say that insom­nia can be indi­cat­ed by ear­ly awak­en­ing and the inabil­i­ty to fall asleep after, fre­quent wak­ing up in the mid­dle of the night, wak­ing up with a feel­ing of tired­ness and weak­ness.

At the same time, sci­en­tists note that in order to alle­vi­ate insom­nia in the long term, it is not drug treat­ment that is effec­tive (as many believe), but cog­ni­tive-behav­ioral ther­a­py.

Myth 5: Snooze alarms help you sleep

Even if calm, qui­et music is select­ed as an alarm sig­nal, for a sleep­ing per­son it sounds like an alarm sig­nal. And the more often he hits repeat, the hard­er it is to get up and stay alert and active through­out the day.

Som­nol­o­gists note that many peo­ple are con­vinced that a lit­tle time after the alarm clock helps them com­plete the cur­rent sleep cycle, but in fact, with each “fail­ure” into the arms of Mor­pheus, a new cycle aris­es, and most like­ly the alarm clock will sound when you find your­self on deep phase of sleep. This means that a new awak­en­ing will make you feel even worse than the pre­vi­ous one. Nev­er press replay!

Myth 6: Sleepiness during the day is due to lack of sleep at night.

It’s no secret that a night with­out sleep is enough to feel bad all day and dream of touch­ing the pil­low with your head at least for a sec­ond. But is day­time sleepi­ness a sign of sleep depri­va­tion? Med­ical prac­tice shows that it is not a fact!

Caus­es of day­time sleepi­ness can be stress, diet, med­ica­tion, body dis­eases and many oth­er rea­sons. To find out the main one, you need to con­sult a doc­tor.

It is inter­est­ing!

Tryp­to­phan is nec­es­sary for the body to syn­the­size sero­tonin, which in turn deter­mines the pro­duc­tion of the sleep hor­mone mela­tonin. There­fore, it is believed that eat­ing foods con­tain­ing tryp­to­phan can help you sleep. How­ev­er, research on this issue did not con­firm this the­o­ry. The pub­li­ca­tion writes about it Neu­ro­science & Biobe­hav­ioral Reviews.

ai generated, nature, woman
realism, odalisque, woman
child, baby, cute
ai generated, woman, bed
bed, bedroom, room

Myth 7: Only those who are fast asleep remember their dreams.

Myth 7: Only those who are fast asleep remember their dreams.

Most peo­ple have dreams every night, but they for­get them. This is due to the fact that we dream dur­ing REM sleep. 2019 study pub­lished in the jour­nal sci­ence, showed that some neu­rons that are active dur­ing the above phase can sup­press a per­son­’s mem­o­ries of dreams.

An inter­est­ing top­ic for reflec­tion was also pre­sent­ed by a group of sci­en­tists from Lyon Neu­ro­science Research Cen­ter and Uni­ver­si­ty Lyon. Sci­en­tists have col­lect­ed respon­dents who remem­ber most of their dreams. After observ­ing them, they found that these peo­ple are awake at night more often com­pared to those who do not remem­ber any­thing. In oth­er words, remem­ber­ing your sleep is not the result of a good night’s rest. You just woke up at the right time to remem­ber!

Expert com­ment

Tim New­man, neu­ro­sci­en­tist

Despite the fact that we spend a third of our lives sleep­ing, sleep still holds a lot of secrets. Sci­en­tists do not skimp on research, but sleep is a phe­nom­e­non that is much more com­pli­cat­ed than it seems! That is why there are so many myths asso­ci­at­ed with it.

For exam­ple, one of them says that eat­ing a piece of cheese before going to bed will cer­tain­ly cause insom­nia. But it is worth repeat­ing this expe­ri­ence, as it turns out that the dairy prod­uct does not inter­fere with sleep.

How­ev­er, eat­ing a large meal before bed, whether it includes cheese or not, can cause heart­burn or indi­ges­tion, which will pre­vent you from falling asleep. And a large din­ner, espe­cial­ly a high-carb diet, can con­tribute to night sweats, which can also inter­fere with sleep. Only through sci­ence and research can we get the true facts about sleep.

By Yraa

Leave a Reply