9 myths about sleep that scientists have debunked

By Yraa #ability, #absence, #absolutely, #academy, #according, #activity, #actually, #advise, #affect, #affects, #afraid, #air, #alcohol, #amazing, #another, #answers, #antioxidant, #any, #apnea, #appearance, #approximately, #aroma, #around, #asleep, #aspects, #associated, #available, #avoid, #awake, #away, #beauty, #becomes, #bed, #bedtime, #been, #begins, #believe, #beneficial, #biological, #blue, #Body, #books, #boring, #both, #break, #breathing, #bright, #burning, #c, #cannot, #carried, #cases, #cause, #causes, #central, #century, #certain, #childhood, #chronic, #clock, #color, #comes, #comfortable, #completely, #computer, #conducted, #consequences, #considered, #content, #continue, #Control, #corresponds, #cortisol, #count, #countries, #current, #danger, #days, #deep, #degrees, #delta, #depends, #depression, #deprivation, #desire, #devices, #diabetes, #did, #different, #difficult, #difficulties, #directly, #diseases, #disorders, #display, #disturbances, #dose, #down, #dream, #dreams, #drink, #drinking, #drop, #drowsiness, #Easy, #eat, #effect, #eliminate, #energy, #enough, #ensure, #essential, #etc, #european, #even, #every, #example, #experience, #experienced, #expert, #experts, #Eye, #Face, #fact, #factor, #factors, #facts, #failure, #fall, #falling, #family, #fast, #feeling, #felt, #few, #find, #fire, #focus, #focused, #follows, #food, #frequent, #function, #functions, #further, #gadgets, #getting, #given, #gland, #glass, #go, #going, #Good, #great, #guaranteed, #habit, #had, #hand, #head, #health, #Healthy, #healthyinfo, #heart, #help, #Helps, #higher, #his, #history, #hot, #hour, #house, #however, #huge, #human, #humidifier, #ideally, #importance, #improves, #indicate, #individual, #insomnia, #institute, #interesting, #internal, #international, #internet, #issue, #itself, #journal, #kind, #know, #lack, #later, #leads, #least, #leave, #leaving, #LED, #less, #lie, #lifestyle, #Light, #likely, #little, #live, #long, #longer, #maintenance, #manage, #matter, #may, #medicine, #melatonin, #minutes, #mistake, #mobile, #monday, #mood, #moreover, #morpheus, #move, #movement, #movements, #much, #myth, #myths, #national, #natural, #Neck, #needs, #negative, #nervous, #never, #nevertheless, #night, #nightmares, #occur, #off, #oils, #opinion, #opportunity, #others, #our, #part, #participants, #people, #period, #phase, #phases, #physiological, #piece, #pillow, #pleasant, #point, #poor, #popular, #population, #positive, #preparation, #presence, #presented, #prevents, #principle, #problems, #processes, #production, #prone, #properly, #properties, #proven, #provided, #published, #pull, #put, #quality, #quickly, #rapid, #rather, #reactions, #read, #ready, #reason, #red, #relatively, #relaxation, #relaxing, #rem, #remains, #remember, #remembered, #researchers, #responsible, #rest, #resting, #return, #rhythm, #rhythms, #risk, #room, #run, #salt, #save, #scientists, #screen, #see, #serious, #set, #sheep, #shift, #showed, #shows, #sign, #significant, #situation, #Skin, #sleep, #Sleeping, #sleeps, #sleepy, #slept, #slow, #slows, #smartphone, #smell, #snack, #snoring, #solves, #some, #someone, #something, #sometimes, #soon, #sound, #specialist, #spends, #starts, #stay, #still, #stopping, #street, #stronger, #studies, #study, #suffer, #suitable, #sure, #swelling, #symptom, #system, #t, #take, #takes, #taking, #tasks, #temperature, #term, #themselves, #therefore, #think, #those, #thus, #today, #too, #total, #true, #try, #turn, #turned, #turns, #two, #type, #unpleasant, #us, #varieties, #various, #very, #vital, #wake, #wakefulness, #waking, #want, #was, #waste, #watch, #waves, #way, #week, #weekend, #were, #where, #whether, #while, #White, #who, #why, #will, #wine, #winter, #working, #world, #worth, #year, #yoga

Most of the time a per­son spends in his own bed. Accord­ing to sci­en­tists, sleep takes from 15 to 30 years of life. But how much do we know about how to sleep prop­er­ly, why do we dream and who has them in col­or?

The most pop­u­lar mis­con­cep­tions about sleep and dreams, as well as true facts about them, are pre­sent­ed by Healthy­in­fo.

Who can’t sleep?

In one night, a per­son can see from 2 to 7 dif­fer­ent dreams. But only 40% of those who sleep can remem­ber them. At the same time, col­or dreams are avail­able only to 12% of the world’s pop­u­la­tion.

For many peo­ple, sleep is a gift at the end of the day, for oth­ers it is a waste of time, and for oth­ers it is a bless­ing that is avail­able only after a dose of sleep­ing pills.

His­to­ry knows many episodes when sleep inspired great dis­cov­er­ies and bril­liant inven­tions, and every year med­i­cine records more and more cas­es of sleep dis­or­ders in peo­ple. Thus, a study con­duct­ed in Rus­sia showed that 45% of peo­ple expe­ri­ence dif­fi­cul­ties with sleep from time to time, and 15% suf­fer from chron­ic insom­nia.

The impor­tance of sleep for the human body is dif­fi­cult to over­es­ti­mate, it is not sur­pris­ing that there are so many myths and mis­con­cep­tions around it.

To dis­pel them, the devel­op­ers of the pop­u­lar med­i­ta­tion and relax­ation app ini­ti­at­ed an inter­est­ing study. It was attend­ed by 4337 peo­ple who hon­est­ly told what they know about sleep. The answers were tru­ly amaz­ing!

Myth 1: The brain rests during sleep.

Myth 1: The brain rests during sleep.

48% of respon­dents think so. And they are wrong!

In fact, while a per­son is sleep­ing and his body is rest­ing, the brain remains active. It is respon­si­ble for the per­for­mance of vital process­es in the body, con­trols its main func­tions. These data were pro­vid­ed by experts Nation­al Sleep Foun­da­tion.

Myth 2: You should never, ever wake up a sleepwalker.

It is amaz­ing, but true: 50% of respon­dents are sure of this. And this is very dan­ger­ous for the life of the “unfor­tu­nate” sleep­walk­er.

Peo­ple who are prone to sleep­walk­ing dur­ing REM sleep go in search of “adven­ture”. They usu­al­ly roam their homes, some­times go out­side, but med­i­cine knows cas­es when peo­ple walked on roofs (and some­times fell from them), paint­ed mag­nif­i­cent paint­ings, or even harmed their rel­a­tives. In the morn­ing, none of them remem­bered what hap­pened at night.

Experts believe that it is nec­es­sary to wake up sleep­walk­ers. And after wak­ing up — again sent to bed.

Myth 3: Dreams only occur during deep sleep.

Myth 3: Dreams only occur during deep sleep.

48% of respon­dents are con­vinced.

Sci­ence today knows for cer­tain that sleep is an alter­na­tion of two phas­es — slow and fast. Dur­ing the slow phase, breath­ing becomes less fre­quent, the heart slows down, and the EEG (elec­troen­cephalo­gram) first shows theta and then super­slow delta rhythms. Dur­ing the fast phase, a per­son has rapid chaot­ic eye move­ment, and fast waves are record­ed on the EEG.

Non-REM sleep takes up approx­i­mate­ly 75–85% of the total sleep peri­od, and some peo­ple believe that dreams are only in this phase. But actu­al­ly it is not! You can see dreams in all phas­es — experts are con­vinced Nation­al Insti­tute of Neu­ro­log­i­cal Dis­or­ders and Stroke. How­ev­er, the most vivid dreams are usu­al­ly dreamed when a per­son is going through a fast phase.

Did you know?

Dur­ing deep sleep, the func­tion of smell is com­plete­ly turned off, so if, for exam­ple, a fire starts in the house, a per­son will not smell burn­ing.

Myth 4: Staying in bed is important for insomnia

30% of respon­dents think so. And they con­tin­ue to count sheep, read bor­ing books or surf the Inter­net in the hope of falling asleep soon­er. Is it worth say­ing it does­n’t work? On the con­trary, unsuc­cess­ful attempts to fall asleep increase the stress hor­mone cor­ti­sol, which fur­ther pro­longs the tor­ment.

Experts Nation­al Sleep Asso­ci­a­tion they advise those who can­not sleep to get out of bed and go to anoth­er room where they can do some relax­ing activ­i­ty. As soon as the feel­ing of drowsi­ness comes, you need to return to bed and most like­ly you will quick­ly fall into the “embrace of Mor­pheus.”

Myth 5: On weekends, you need to sleep off your weekdays.

Myth 5: On weekends, you need to sleep off your weekdays.

Few peo­ple man­age to sleep as much time as they want on week­days. Most peo­ple have to get up ear­ly and get ready for school or work. There­fore, few peo­ple miss the oppor­tu­ni­ty to get a good night’s sleep on the week­end, believ­ing that in this way they can catch up. But it’s not!

A recent study pub­lished in the jour­nal cur­rent Biol­o­gy, showed that attempts to com­pen­sate for lack of sleep on week­ends are doomed to fail­ure. And all because they do not can­cel the neg­a­tive con­se­quences expe­ri­enced by the body of a per­son who sleeps lit­tle on work­ing days. Get­ting enough sleep on week­days and week­ends is essen­tial to stay­ing healthy.

Myth 6: Drinking alcohol before bed helps you fall asleep.

20% of respon­dents are con­vinced of this. If there is no sleep in any eye, it is enough to drink a glass of red or white wine (or some­thing stronger), and the “degrees” will dri­ve you to bed …

And while alco­hol does make you sleepy and can help you fall asleep, in the long run, drink­ing does a dis­ser­vice by “guar­an­tee­ing” poor sleep qual­i­ty and fre­quent awak­en­ings.

[cite src=“https://healthyinfo.top/wp-content/uploads/2023/07/shutterstock_379326586.jpg” name=“А вы знали?”]

Alco­hol before bed[cite src=“https://healthyinfo.top/wp-content/uploads/2023/07/shutterstock_379326586.jpg” name=“А вы знали?”]

t the abil­i­ty to move, his body becomes numb and at the same time some­one’s unpleas­ant pres­ence is felt. For health, sleep paral­y­sis does not pose any dan­ger, but it can scare you very much.

Myth 7: Snoring is completely harmless.

Myth 7: Snoring is completely harmless.

At least for the per­son who snores, 17% of the peo­ple sur­veyed think. Giv­en that such, accord­ing to experts Amer­i­can Acad­e­my of Oto­laryn­gol­o­gy and Neck Surgery, from 25 to 45%, the rest have to put up with it. And this is a mis­take!

Experts Nation­al Sleep Foun­da­tion warn the pub­lic that snor­ing can indi­cate seri­ous health prob­lems. For exam­ple, point to apnea — stop­ping breath­ing move­ments dur­ing sleep. There­fore, you should not put up with snor­ing, you need to find the cause of its occur­rence and elim­i­nate it.

Myth 8: Cheese before bed causes nightmares.

15% of respon­dents are con­vinced of this. It turns out that in the folk­lore of some Euro­pean coun­tries in the 18–19th cen­tu­ry there was such a sign. There­fore, some peo­ple today are afraid to eat cheese before bed. And absolute­ly in vain!

In 2005, the first study on this issue was car­ried out. It was attend­ed by 200 vol­un­teers. It turned out that a piece of cheese before bed did not cause any neg­a­tive reac­tions in 70% of peo­ple, and some of the par­tic­i­pants even had pleas­ant dreams. By the way, dreams direct­ly depend­ed on the type of cheese: some vari­eties evoked child­hood mem­o­ries, while oth­ers sur­re­al­is­tic utopias.

Myth 9: It doesn’t matter what time of day you go to bed.

Myth 9: It doesn't matter what time of day you go to bed.

The human body fol­lows a nat­ur­al rhythm of wake­ful­ness and sleep, which, for some rea­son, cor­re­sponds to the move­ment of the Sun (tak­ing into account sun­ris­es and sun­sets). How­ev­er, career, fam­i­ly and oth­er aspects of life can force a per­son to stay awake at night and sleep dur­ing the day. In the long term, this leads to health prob­lems, the researchers are con­vinced.

So, peo­ple who work the night shift are more like­ly to expe­ri­ence cir­ca­di­an rhythm dis­tur­bances and have poor sleep qual­i­ty. In addi­tion, they have a high­er risk of cer­tain dis­eases, includ­ing depres­sion and dia­betes. There­fore, it is bet­ter to sleep sweet­ly in your crib, nev­er­the­less, at night.

Pleas­ant dreams!

Expert com­ment

Nina Kolomiyt­se­va, cer­ti­fied spe­cial­ist of the Inter­na­tion­al Yoga Asso­ci­a­tion (Yoga alliance)

Sleep is an impor­tant part of any per­son­’s life. After all, in addi­tion to rest­ing in a dream, the body solves impor­tant tasks for it asso­ci­at­ed with var­i­ous phys­i­o­log­i­cal process­es. Some of them occur pre­cise­ly in the state of sleep: for exam­ple, cer­tain hor­mones are pro­duced.

From the point of view of yoga, in a dream there are process­es of ener­gy exchange with the Uni­verse, so the impor­tance of sleep for a per­son can­not be under­es­ti­mat­ed.

Despite all of the above, a huge num­ber of peo­ple have sleep prob­lems, which are often to blame them­selves.

For exam­ple, most of us have a habit of falling asleep to the TV, com­put­er, tablet screen or phone in hand. Accord­ing to these peo­ple, the pres­ence of gad­gets and the abil­i­ty to leave the TV on improves the qual­i­ty of sleep and, in prin­ci­ple, helps to fall asleep. How­ev­er, in fact, it has long been proven that the blue light emit­ted by smart­phone screens, com­put­ers and TVs is very harm­ful both to human skin and pre­vents the pro­duc­tion of mela­tonin, the sleep hor­mone. More­over, the habit of falling asleep with the devices turned on and the sound pro­vokes insom­nia.

There­fore, accus­tom your­self to go to bed cor­rect­ly — put away all gad­gets an hour before going to bed, turn off the TV, do not watch the news before going to bed. To sleep, you need silence, the absence of any irri­tants (includ­ing light and sounds), a com­fort­able mat­tress and a ven­ti­lat­ed room. And most impor­tant­ly: go to bed no lat­er than 12 o’clock at night, ide­al­ly at 11 pm. Since it is at this time that the activ­i­ty of the pitu­itary gland begins to increase.

Anoth­er myth about sleep can be con­sid­ered the opin­ion that you need to sleep at least 8 hours at night. In fact, the num­ber of hours for sleep is indi­vid­ual and depends on the inter­nal needs of the body. Whether you have enough time for qual­i­ty sleep is very easy to find out.

Sleep should occur 10–20 min­utes after you pur­pose­ful­ly lie down in bed. If you toss and turn for an hour or more, then you are sleep­ing too much (or have expe­ri­enced sleep dis­tur­bances). If you fall asleep as soon as your head hits the pil­low, you are not get­ting enough rest.

Try to avoid sleep depri­va­tion: go to bed at the same time (before 12), and get up ear­ly in the morn­ing. It is very impor­tant. Since the desire to sleep off on the week­end is a rather dan­ger­ous myth that leads to the restruc­tur­ing of bio­log­i­cal rhythms. If you didn’t get enough sleep all week for one rea­son or anoth­er, then decid­ed to take a break on the week­end and slept until 11–12 on Sat­ur­day and until one on Sun­day, then you are guar­an­teed to go to bed lat­er, which means that on Mon­day it will be dif­fi­cult for you to get up ear­ly, and you won’t sleep again.

Wak­ing up on week­days and week­ends is desir­able at the same time. Sleep­ing more than your body needs is not healthy and may be a symp­tom of some kind of mal­func­tion in the body: the pres­ence of depres­sion, meta­bol­ic dis­or­ders, etc. Accord­ing to stud­ies, peo­ple who sleep no more than 6–8 hours a night live longer. At the same time, the life expectan­cy of those who like to sleep is rel­a­tive­ly less.

Expert com­ment

Yana Kasatk­i­na, beau­ty blog­ger

Sleep is a sig­nif­i­cant fac­tor in a healthy lifestyle that affects mood and vital­i­ty, hor­mone pro­duc­tion, meta­bol­ic process­es, and appear­ance. Sleep direct­ly affects the main­te­nance of human health and beau­ty.

The youth hor­mone Mela­tonin (it also has immunos­tim­u­lat­ing and antiox­i­dant prop­er­ties) is pro­duced before 23:00.

Ade­quate sleep will help ensure the fol­low­ing fac­tors:

    Lack of light in the room: from LED lamps, mobile phone screen, tablet, TV, night lamp, street lamp outside the window and even the moon. A salt lamp is suitable as a night light for the period of preparation for sleep. Avoid phones and TV two hours before bedtime, or install an app on your phone that adjusts the color temperature of the display. Thick night curtains or a sleep mask will also help.
    The air temperature in the room is up to 22 C degrees.
    Humidity is above 60. A humidifier will save the situation in winter.
    Smell. Aroma oils to help relax and have a beneficial effect on the central nervous system (central nervous system).
    positive thoughts. Our thoughts affect the production of hormones that control our mood, reactions, state. In a state of depression or stress, it is difficult to fall asleep, and the sleep itself is often of poor quality. Therefore, we focus on the positive and make bright plans.
    Dinner 2 hours before bed. By the time you go to bed, the body should not be focused on digesting food, the stomach is set to rest. If you still want to eat, then 1–1.5 hours before bedtime make a light snack.
    Sleep position. For a good rest of the body, you will need an orthopedic pillow and an orthopedic mattress. A plus will be the disappearance of creases and swelling on the face.

If you still can’t fall asleep, then take a hot show­er, after leav­ing the show­er, the body tem­per­a­ture will drop and the body will pull into sleep.

All healthy sleep, and there­fore beau­ty!

By Yraa

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