9 reasons why you can’t get enough sleep

By Yraa #academy, #activity, #advise, #affects, #alarm, #allergies, #allergy, #almost, #alone, #amount, #another, #areas, #ask, #asleep, #author, #average, #avoiding, #awake, #background, #bath, #bed, #being, #blender, #block, #Body, #boiled, #books, #both, #bright, #called, #calories, #can’t, #carbohydrates, #cardiovascular, #cardiovascular disease, #causes, #center, #changing, #children, #chronic, #Clinical, #clock, #closed, #combat, #come, #comfortable, #compared, #conditions, #conducted, #consider, #constant, #constantly, #Control, #cortisol, #couple, #d, #days, #decrease, #deprivation, #desire, #did, #diet, #difficult, #difficulties, #disease, #disorders, #down, #dreams, #due, #each, #easier, #effective, #egg, #either, #enough, #even, #evening, #every, #exercising, #existing, #experiment, #expert, #experts, #Eyes, #fact, #fall, #falls, #familiar, #fatigue, #fats, #few, #find, #foods, #full, #further, #g, #gets, #getting, #ghrelin, #go, #going, #Good, #got, #half, #hanging, #hard, #he, #health, #help, #Helps, #high, #higher, #him, #his, #hormonal, #hour, #human, #hunger, #hungry, #hypertension, #ideal, #immune, #impact, #improve, #increased, #increasing, #infection, #insomnia, #instead, #journal, #keep, #know, #lack, #leading, #least, #LED, #left, #less, #levels, #libido, #Light, #lights, #likelihood, #likely, #long, #loses, #losing, #lost, #loved, #m, #made, #manage, #manifestations, #md, #Medical, #medicine, #Men, #middle, #minutes, #mistake, #moments, #monday, #morpheus, #much, #negative, #never, #night, #norm, #note, #nothing, #obesity, #off, #old, #ones, #open, #options, #overweight, #participants, #partner, #peak, #people, #phase, #pillow, #poor, #portion, #problems, #production, #protein, #proteins, #provoke, #published, #purchasing, #puts, #putting, #quality, #range, #reach, #reasons, #recommend, #relaxing, #rem, #research, #respiratory, #rest, #result, #results, #rises, #risk, #room, #running, #says, #schedule, #see, #seek, #Sensitive, #serious, #setting, #several, #Severe, #sex, #show, #showed, #shown, #side, #sleep, #Sleeping, #slept, #small, #snack, #snoring, #solve, #some, #something, #sometimes, #special, #stage, #starts, #stimulates, #stop, #street, #strength, #studies, #study, #sure, #sweet, #swings, #system, #systematic, #t, #take, #taking, #technique, #tension, #testosterone, #thereby, #therefore, #think, #thinking, #those, #thought, #thousand, #threatens, #times, #today, #too, #track, #train, #treatment, #try, #trying, #turn, #turning, #twice, #university, #useful, #volume, #wake, #waking, #washing, #week, #weight, #while, #who, #why, #woman, #Women, #working, #worse, #would, #year

Some­times after a night of sleep, the state of health is even worse than dur­ing the day. Stud­ies show that chron­ic sleep depri­va­tion and inter­rupt­ed sleep are among the main caus­es of car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease, hyper­ten­sion and even obe­si­ty.

The good news is that if you man­age to get enough sleep for a few nights, some of these con­di­tions can be reversed!

Difficulties in the Dreaming Kingdom

Research con­duct­ed in the UK has shown that the aver­age per­son gets only 6 hours and 36 min­utes of sleep each night. That’s one hour and 24 min­utes less than what experts rec­om­mend. Today, most of them are sure that a per­son should get at least 8 hours of sleep every night.

In a year, a per­son los­es a stag­ger­ing 511 hours of sleep, which is 64 full nights! Not sur­pris­ing­ly, con­stant lack of sleep has a neg­a­tive impact on all areas of human life.

    The participants of the experiment admitted that their productivity at work falls by almost half, it is enough for them to sleep less than 8 hours twice a week. 28% of those surveyed made a serious mistake at work.
    Half of the respondents noted that fatigue and tension as a result of lack of sleep led to the fact that they would never come off on their loved one. And another 26% “recouped” on children.
    58% of the participants in the experiment constantly forgot something as a result of lack of sleep, and 5% even got into the wrong bus, train or subway.

What keeps peo­ple from sleep­ing? About the most insid­i­ous “thieves” of sleep — fur­ther.

1. You think too much.

1. You think too much.

Some peo­ple, instead of relax­ing and try­ing to sleep, even in bed solve work­ing moments, prove their case in dis­putes and think out the plot of the movie they watched.

Colleen Car­ney, Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor of Psy­chi­a­try from Duke uni­ver­si­ty Med­ical Cen­ter says that with poor con­trol of their thoughts, peo­ple can go in and out of a light stage of sleep, while think­ing that they are awake.

To fall asleep, he rec­om­mends get­ting out of bed, turn­ing on the light, and going out into anoth­er room for a few min­utes. This is usu­al­ly enough to stop the thoughts from both­er­ing you. This strat­e­gy is called the incen­tive con­trol tech­nique.

2. You slept for a long time the night before.

Not get­ting enough sleep on week­days, some peo­ple catch up on week­ends, and then wake up on Mon­day morn­ings like “zom­bies”. M.D Lau­rence Epstein says that it knocks down a per­son­’s bio­rhythms and drags along a string of prob­lems.

You should not sleep more than 1 hour on week­ends com­pared to work­ing days. If you need to make up for lost hours of sleep, you can sleep dur­ing the day — but no more than 30 min­utes.

3. Your partner snores

The peak vol­ume of a sleep­ing per­son snor­ing can reach 90 deci­bels, stud­ies show, which is iden­ti­cal to the vol­ume of a run­ning blender. Even if a per­son man­ages to fall asleep before a part­ner starts snor­ing, snor­ing can wake him up at night dur­ing the most sen­si­tive phase of sleep — REM.

Experts advise in this case to ask your part­ner to sleep on your side, get him a spe­cial pil­low for snor­ing peo­ple (it helps a per­son sleep in a posi­tion in which his air­ways are open) or, at worst, get earplugs.

Did you know?

Peo­ple who don’t get enough sleep are at high­er risk of con­tract­ing a res­pi­ra­to­ry viral infec­tion as the body’s immune sys­tem is weak­ened.

4. Your hormones are changing.

4. Your hormones are changing.

Rep­re­sen­ta­tives of the fair sex are famil­iar with this prob­lem first­hand. “Swings in estro­gen lev­els before or dur­ing crit­i­cal days, as well as dur­ing per­i­menopause, can dis­rupt a woman’s sleep,” says Asso­ciate Pro­fes­sor of Med­i­cine. Joyce Wohlsleben. — Often they wake up at night with­out know­ing why.”

The expert advis­es tak­ing a relax­ing bath before bed, stick­ing to a sleep-wake sched­ule, exer­cis­ing at least 30 min­utes a day, and avoid­ing caf­feinat­ed foods after din­ner. If the prob­lem per­sists, you should seek med­ical help.

5. You go to bed hungry.

Peter Howry, PhD, Hon­orary Pro­fes­sor Mayo Clin­ic, says that many los­ing weight wake up in the mid­dle of the night from hunger. Try­ing to invest in the norm of calo­ries, peo­ple go to bed hun­gry, because of which they often wake up.

The expert rec­om­mends review­ing your diet and set­ting aside a cou­ple of hun­dred calo­ries for an evening snack. A small por­tion of cheese or a hard-boiled egg would be ide­al. You can also con­sid­er oth­er options for pro­tein (this is impor­tant!) Snack. Pro­teins are more sati­at­ing than car­bo­hy­drates and fats.

6. There are lights in your room

Who would have thought, but the dif­fused light of street lamps, an alarm clock or the back­light of a DVD play­er can keep you awake. Amy Wolf­sonPh.D., author of books on sleep dis­or­ders, says that even a small amount of light can be bright enough to pen­e­trate the reti­na of even closed eyes.

To block exter­nal bright­ness, the expert rec­om­mends hang­ing black­out cur­tains, putting on a sleep mask before going to bed, and turn­ing off lights.

On a note!

Sleep depri­va­tion affects the hor­mon­al back­ground of a per­son, stim­u­lates increased pro­duc­tion of the “hunger hor­mone” ghre­lin. There­fore, those peo­ple who sleep less are more like­ly to strug­gle with being over­weight.

7. Dust mites can bother you

7. Dust mites can bother you

“You can share your bed with dust mites, which can range from a few hun­dred thou­sand to sev­er­al tens of mil­lions,” says MD, asso­ciate Amer­i­can Acad­e­my of Aller­gy Alan Gold­so­bel. — The results of the activ­i­ty of ticks can pro­voke man­i­fes­ta­tions of aller­gies — from mild to severe.

The expert rec­om­mends replac­ing mat­tress­es that are more than 10 years old, pur­chas­ing linen that blocks the activ­i­ty of ticks due to spe­cial treat­ment, and wash­ing exist­ing ones at high tem­per­a­tures. In addi­tion, it is use­ful to open win­dows in the morn­ing and ven­ti­late the room well. A study pub­lished in Jour­nal of Aller­gy and Clin­i­cal Immunol­o­gy, showed that this is one of the most effec­tive ways to com­bat dust mites.

8. You keep track of the clock

Wak­ing up mul­ti­ple times and check­ing the clock to see how much sleep is left can increase anx­i­ety, anger, and frus­tra­tion. The stress hor­mone cor­ti­sol ris­es in the body, which puts an end to attempts to fall asleep again.

Experts rec­om­mend that before going to bed, turn the alarm clock to the wall. Then when you wake up, with­out get­ting anoth­er por­tion of stress, you can fall asleep eas­i­er.

9. You try to sleep in an uncomfortable position.

Try­ing to sleep in an uncom­fort­able posi­tion, either alone or with your part­ner, puts stress on your body, lead­ing to sleep prob­lems. If you find it dif­fi­cult to fall asleep when your part­ner is hug­ging you or the cat is loung­ing impos­ing­ly on your chest, do not tor­ture your­self!

Take a com­fort­able posi­tion for sleep­ing and do not change it until you plunge into the realm of Mor­pheus. And you can hug your part­ner and stroke your beloved cat in the morn­ing, when noth­ing threat­ens the night rest.

Fact!

Sleep depri­va­tion can decrease libido and increase the like­li­hood of prob­lems such as erec­tile dys­func­tion. While sleep restores strength and reg­u­lates testos­terone lev­els, there­by increas­ing sex­u­al desire in both men and women.

Sweet Dreams!

Does exer­cise improve sleep for adults with insom­nia? A sys­tem­at­ic review with qual­i­ty appraisal / Lowea H., Had­dockab G., Mul­li­ganc L.D., et al // Clin­i­cal Psy­chol­o­gy Review, Vol­ume 68 - 2019

By Yraa

Leave a Reply