Diseases of the oral cavity and their effect on the body: stroke, cancer, impotence

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The human body is a per­fect sys­tem, where every­thing is inter­con­nect­ed, and some dis­eases will pro­voke oth­ers. Patients are not even aware of the close rela­tion­ship between the state of the oral cav­i­ty, inter­nal organs and meta­bol­ic process­es. But, mean­while, stud­ies con­duct­ed by sci­en­tists in tan­dem with den­tists show that dis­eases of the teeth and gums can be asso­ci­at­ed with the devel­op­ment of strokes, affect male pow­er, and be the cause of dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem. Healthy­in­fo will tell you what to fear for patients who ignore den­tal treat­ment.

Gum disease and ischemic stroke

Gum disease and ischemic stroke

Peri­odon­ti­tis is an insid­i­ous dis­ease, in the prac­tice of den­tists mean­ing inflam­ma­tion of peri­odon­tal tis­sues — the sup­port­ing appa­ra­tus of the tooth. Peri­odon­ti­tis can pro­ceed with­out symp­toms for a long time, and patients come to the appoint­ment already with ini­tial signs of bone tis­sue destruc­tion.

Sci­en­tists from the Unit­ed States con­duct­ed stud­ies that led to the con­clu­sion that peo­ple with peri­odon­ti­tis are at risk for the for­ma­tion of ischemic stroke.

The study involved more than 6.5 thou­sand patients diag­nosed with peri­odon­ti­tis of vary­ing sever­i­ty. Of inter­est was not only the dis­ease itself, but also the absence of a his­to­ry of stroke. We remind you that a stroke is an acute vio­la­tion of cere­bral cir­cu­la­tion, accom­pa­nied by a sud­den loss of con­scious­ness and paral­y­sis. Den­tists observed patients for 15 years. Doc­tors were inter­est­ed in the num­ber of record­ed strokes.

Stud­ies by sci­en­tists have shown that patients with mild, mod­er­ate and severe peri­odon­ti­tis were diag­nosed with stroke 1.9–2.2 times more often than those who did not suf­fer from peri­odon­ti­tis. The data from this study were pre­sent­ed to the sci­en­tif­ic world in 2017 at the Inter­na­tion­al Stroke Con­fer­ence in the USA.

Gum disease and cardiovascular system

Gum disease and ischemic stroke

Dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem kill more peo­ple than can­cer. Patients are aware of the main provo­ca­teurs of dis­eases: mal­nu­tri­tion, bad habits, inac­tive lifestyle, etc. But few peo­ple real­ize that the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem depends on the state of the oral cav­i­ty. Research pub­lished in the Jour­nal of the Amer­i­can Acad­e­my of Peri­odon­tol­ogy shows that caries and its com­pli­ca­tions, inflam­ma­to­ry and degen­er­a­tive changes in the gums, sig­nif­i­cant­ly increase the risk of devel­op­ing dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem. The rea­son lies in the bac­te­ria that cause dis­eases of the oral cav­i­ty, which can spread through­out the body and pro­voke var­i­ous dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem. When they spread through the blood­stream, the results can be fatal. Sci­en­tists from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Bris­tol man­aged to dis­cov­er the mech­a­nism of devel­op­ment of infec­tive endo­cardi­tis. These data allow to make a break­through in the treat­ment of dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem. The whole dan­ger of pathol­o­gy lies in the like­li­hood of the for­ma­tion of blood clots in the tis­sues of the heart. If left untreat­ed, the dis­ease can lead to death.

Hyper­ten­sion is a com­mon and dan­ger­ous dis­ease. If left untreat­ed, this is a dis­tant prospect of the for­ma­tion of a stroke, heart attack and oth­er seri­ous patholo­gies. Stud­ies have shown that increased risks of devel­op­ing pres­sure prob­lems are asso­ci­at­ed with poor oral hygiene.

More than 20 thou­sand peo­ple took part in the study, which was con­duct­ed in 2008–2010. Den­tists assessed the qual­i­ty of oral hygiene by den­tal indices and blood pres­sure sta­tus. In patients with low hygiene indi­ca­tors, the risks of devel­op­ing attacks of hyper­ten­sion increased sig­nif­i­cant­ly.

This rela­tion­ship can be explained by inflam­ma­tion of the gums. Sat­is­fac­to­ry hygiene is one of the pow­er­ful fac­tors in the pre­ven­tion of gum dis­ease, so that the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem will be safer.

Dr. Joan Oto­mo-Korgel empha­sizes that the study will require fur­ther refine­ment and fur­ther obser­va­tions, because there are unre­solved ques­tions and mys­ter­ies. But the link between hyper­ten­sion and peri­odon­ti­tis is already as clear as the link between gum dis­ease and dia­betes.

Missing teeth and dementia

Sci­en­tists from the Uni­ver­si­ty of Japan have proven the con­nec­tion between sec­ondary aden­tia, that is, the absence of teeth, and the risk of devel­op­ing senile demen­tia. The study itself took place over a peri­od of 5 years, in which more than 1.5 thou­sand peo­ple in the age group of 60 years and old­er took part.

All par­tic­i­pants were divid­ed into three groups. This clas­si­fi­ca­tion is based on the num­ber of miss­ing teeth:

    the first group: 10–19 missing teeth;
    the second group: 1–9 missing teeth;
    the third group is the complete absence of teeth.

The con­trol group con­sist­ed of indi­vid­u­als who retained 20 or more teeth. The risks asso­ci­at­ed with the for­ma­tion of senile demen­tia in dif­fer­ent groups were 62–81% high­er com­pared to the con­trol group. Also, sci­en­tists from Japan point to the con­nec­tion of a large num­ber of miss­ing teeth and Alzheimer’s dis­ease. Research on this top­ic was pub­lished in the March 2016 issue of the Amer­i­can Geri­atric Soci­ety.

Gum disease and men’s health

Sci­en­tif­ic stud­ies pub­lished by the jour­nal Den­tistry have shown that the treat­ment of peri­odon­tal dis­ease facil­i­tates the course of pro­sta­ti­tis and helps to pro­tect the patient from the for­ma­tion of com­pli­ca­tions of this pathol­o­gy. The study involved 27 men diag­nosed with pro­sta­ti­tis, and all of them under­went a thor­ough exam­i­na­tion by a den­tist.

As a result, all men were diag­nosed with mod­er­ate to severe peri­odon­ti­tis. They received appro­pri­ate den­tal treat­ment, but no treat­ment for pro­sta­ti­tis was pre­scribed. Sub­se­quent­ly, the sub­jects were re-exam­ined. In 21 peo­ple, a decrease in the lev­el of PSA (prostate-spe­cif­ic anti­gen) was detect­ed.

tooth decay, dentist, dental

Thus, the sci­en­tists were able to con­clude that a qual­i­fied treat­ment of gum dis­ease can improve the con­di­tion of the prostate, alle­vi­ate the course of pro­sta­ti­tis, and even improve the patien­t’s qual­i­ty of life. Sci­en­tists believe that treat­ment by a peri­odon­tist for prostate dis­eases should be as stan­dard as den­tal treat­ment for dis­eases of the car­dio­vas­cu­lar sys­tem and kid­ney dis­ease.

By Yraa

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