How your career progress depends on sleep: lack of sleep vs. promotion

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We asso­ciate career growth with pro­fes­sion­al­ism, moti­va­tion, com­mu­ni­ca­tion skills, and final­ly, luck and con­nec­tions. But sci­en­tists say that pro­mo­tion is affect­ed by how much and how you sleep. Let’s find out more with Healthy­in­fo!

Chronic lack of sleep: what does it do to us

Chron­ic lack of sleep is com­mon. About 25% of adults are report­ed to have insom­nia, and one in four say they reg­u­lar­ly feel very sleepy dur­ing the day.

    Sleep disturbances greatly increase the likelihood of developing heart and vascular problems, depressive disorders, and even cancerous pathologies. In addition, lack of sleep affects work productivity.
    Meta-analysis results (human Performance) show that lack of sleep seriously slows down the pace of work, mainly due to the fact that fatigue prevails over cheerfulness, and the mood after a short sleep is not particularly joyful.
    Lack of sleep harms work results, reduces productivity, satisfaction, motivation, and finally, it harms career advancement and provokes accidents. And vice versa: a sufficient amount of sleep is associated with an increase in memory, attention, learning new information and skills.

If you can’t get enough sleep at night, know that sci­en­tists have proven that even a short nap at lunchtime is ben­e­fi­cial. 15–20 min­utes can be enough to cheer up and fin­ish the rest of the day.

It is inter­est­ing!

In the coun­try of great worka­holics — Japan — there is such a thing as inemuri. This is a dream dur­ing the day in a pub­lic place: at work, in trans­port, even at a meet­ing (if the rest are low­er in rank than the sleep­ing one). More­over, such a qui­et hour is a prac­tice sup­port­ed by soci­ety: if a per­son sleeps dur­ing the day, it means that he works very hard and does not have time to sleep at night.

There is an excep­tion, of course, in pro­fes­sions, when it is dan­ger­ous for oth­ers. A sleep­ing dri­ver will def­i­nite­ly be fired.

“But Lenin slept 4 hours a day and worked”: individual sleep norms

“But Lenin slept 4 hours a day and worked”: individual sleep norms

While in gen­er­al there are norms for adults — almost every­one needs 7–8 hours of sleep, there are also lucky ones with a unique per­son­al­i­ty and bio­log­i­cal con­fig­u­ra­tion that allows them to sleep much less with­out los­ing pro­duc­tiv­i­ty. And this is not relat­ed to age and health, but can be inher­it­ed.

There is evi­denceSci­enceDi­rect) that the need for sleep is genet­i­cal­ly trans­mit­ted: it is often the same for twins, even if they were sep­a­rat­ed in child­hood.

Fact!

They say, Aris­to­tle Onas­sis worked three shifts, slept for four hours, and taught the rest: “Don’t sleep too much, so as not to wake up a los­er.” At the same time, he cal­cu­lat­ed that three “extra” hours of sleep every night result in a month and a half every year — so many peo­ple lose, and there­fore do not suc­ceed.

Here it would not be super­flu­ous to recall that he is also cred­it­ed with adven­tur­ism, grasp­ing and eaves­drop­ping on tele­phone con­ver­sa­tions of mafia clans while work­ing as a tele­com oper­a­tor just at the moment when the Onas­sis empire began to flour­ish.

They also say about Lenin that he slept quite a bit, but Tom Ford real­ly got enough sleep for three hours a day.

How­ev­er, such cas­es rarely become the basis for sci­en­tif­ic research.

What do we real­ly know about the rela­tion­ship between the qual­i­ty of work and sleep, besides the fact that we spend a third of our adult life on each of the class­es and reg­u­lar­ly sac­ri­fice rest for the sake of work?

Unhealthy sleep habits affect the future from childhood

Sleep prob­lems occur before the start of work. A num­ber of stud­ies prove that in the process of learn­ing, sleep dis­tur­bances affect per­for­mance (Sci­ence direct).

There is a clear cause-and-effect rela­tion­ship between sleep dis­tur­bances and clin­i­cal man­i­fes­ta­tions of ill health, even in chil­dren before school, and once school begins, lack of sleep reduces the like­li­hood of get­ting a good mark, fol­lowed by a good edu­ca­tion and employ­ment. And this has been revealed even in those coun­tries where (as is often the case in Rus­sia) there is no clear cor­re­la­tion between “uni­ver­si­ty qual­i­fi­ca­tions” and salary lev­els. The long-term con­se­quences of unhealthy sleep reduce the like­li­hood of a suc­cess­ful career.

Fact!

Sci­en­tists advise schools and uni­ver­si­ties to set a lat­er start of lessons: this improves stu­dents’ sleep and has a pos­i­tive effect on test results.

Sleep and work motivation

Sleep and work motivation

A well-sleep per­son is more active­ly involved in the work process. Mil­lions can be spent to moti­vate employ­ees — to increase the degree of enthu­si­asm, pro­duc­tiv­i­ty, sat­is­fac­tion. In offices, spe­cial­ists work on design, menus in can­teens, addi­tion­al bonus­es — from train­ings to cof­fee machines in each office.

How­ev­er, sci­en­tists say that all these are fac­tors that can eas­i­ly cross out the usu­al lack of sleep if employ­ees do not have time to sleep after a hard day.

business, businessman, woman
lake, trees, nature
ai generated, woman, business woman
woman, cliff, jumping
interview, business, recruitment

Impor­tant!

It is worth remem­ber­ing that the quan­ti­ty and qual­i­ty of sleep, unlike oth­er fac­tors, we can con­trol our­selves. And if you improve your reg­i­men, the ben­e­fits will not keep you wait­ing. Read what bad habits pre­vent you from get­ting enough sleep.​

If the boss is not sleeping

Lead­ers are lead­ers to set an exam­ple and inspire sub­or­di­nates to work. If the boss is incom­pe­tent, puts pres­sure on employ­ees and reduces their moti­va­tion, he there­by wors­ens the qual­i­ty of their sleep — who will be able to fall asleep quick­ly if dis­turb­ing thoughts are in their heads?

On the oth­er hand, a com­pe­tent leader mit­i­gates the effects of lack of sleep. Here is such a para­dox.

How­ev­er, it only works if the boss — even the best one — gets enough sleep him­self. So the secret of good lead­er­ship is not only in pro­fes­sion­al and per­son­al qual­i­ties, but also in observ­ing the dai­ly rou­tine.

Expert com­ment

Thomas Chamor­ro-Pre­mu­sic, Pro­fes­sor, Uni­ver­si­ty Col­lege Lon­don

The dura­tion and qual­i­ty of sleep do have an impact on your career. The soon­er you start work­ing on your sleep habits, the more suc­cess­ful you will be in your pro­fes­sion­al life. You should not try to look like a hero and brag (even to your­self) about how lit­tle you have to sleep and work hard. There is a good chance that pro­duc­tiv­i­ty and career will begin to suf­fer as much as health and per­son­al life from lack of sleep.

One of the ways I rec­om­mend to help your­self work bet­ter and earn more is to start get­ting good sleep at night.

We talk about how to quick­ly fall asleep accord­ing to the meth­ods of spe­cial ser­vices in this arti­cle.

By Yraa

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