Is it true that sleep problems can occur after an illness?

By Yraa #able, #abuse, #academy, #according, #activity, #advice, #advised, #afraid, #against, #age, #air, #alcohol, #allow, #already, #amount, #another, #anywhere, #apnea, #appearance, #approach, #article, #asleep, #associated, #automatic, #awake, #away, #background, #bad, #bath, #becomes, #bed, #bedtime, #been, #beginning, #begins, #behavior, #being, #blood, #Body, #both, #breathing, #called, #cases, #cause, #caused, #cells, #center, #central, #certain, #characterized, #check, #chosen, #chronic, #Clear, #cognitive, #comes, #common, #complain, #complaints, #completely, #computer, #concentrate, #conducted, #connection, #consequences, #constantly, #consumed, #Control, #could, #creates, #cycle, #daily, #damage, #daytime, #deal, #depression, #deterioration, #develop, #developed, #diabetes, #did, #different, #difficulties, #difficulty, #disease, #disorders, #disturbances, #doctors, #dose, #doubt, #down, #dr, #dream, #drink, #drinking, #drowsiness, #due, #duration, #each, #easily, #Easy, #eat, #effects, #effort, #enough, #especially, #even, #evening, #everything, #exclude, #experience, #experienced, #experts, #Eyes, #fact, #factors, #fall, #falling, #fatigue, #fear, #feed, #feel, #feeling, #focus, #focusing, #follow, #forbidden, #form, #functioning, #gadgets, #gland, #go, #going, #habit, #had, #half, #hand, #hands, #head, #healthier, #Healthy, #healthyinfo, #hearing, #help, #her, #high, #himself, #his, #Home, #however, #impact, #impossible, #increased, #increases, #infection, #insomnia, #internet, #irritability, #itself, #just, #known, #lack, #late, #later, #leads, #least, #less, #levels, #lie, #lifestyle, #literally, #long, #longer, #look, #loss, #lot, #loved, #lungs, #maintain, #maintaining, #making, #manage, #may, #Medical, #medication, #medications, #medicine, #melatonin, #member, #Men, #might, #mind, #minute, #minutes, #moreover, #move, #much, #natural, #needs, #negative, #nervous, #night, #note, #nothing, #now, #nutrition, #obesity, #occur, #occurs, #off, #offer, #old, #ones, #opinion, #organ, #our, #particular, #pass, #patients, #people, #phenomenon, #physical, #physical activity, #pillow, #point, #present, #principles, #problems, #production, #programs, #proper, #psychologist, #question, #re, #really, #received, #recently, #recommend, #recommended, #Reduce, #regime, #regimen, #research, #returns, #rhythms, #rule, #scientists, #screen, #seem, #sensations, #shortly, #shown, #side, #similar, #simple, #sleep, #small, #smartphone, #smell, #snoring, #some, #soon, #source, #spend, #spent, #starts, #stay, #still, #stop, #substance, #suffer, #sufficient, #sure, #symptoms, #system, #t, #take, #taken, #takes, #taste, #themselves, #thing, #things, #those, #thought, #thyroid, #times, #too, #trace, #transferred, #true, #try, #turn, #turned, #turns, #undesirable, #university, #USA, #using, #various, #very, #vessels, #want, #warm, #was, #watch, #weather, #were, #who, #whole, #will, #working, #works, #worry

SARS-CoV­‑2 is an insid­i­ous infec­tion. Even if the dis­ease was trans­ferred in a mild form, a long trail of con­se­quences can fol­low, one of which is sleep dis­tur­bances.

Healthy­in­fo talks about COVID-som­nia, as experts have already called this phe­nom­e­non.

The impact of coronavirus infection on the nervous system

The impact of coronavirus infection on the nervous system

There is no doubt that such an impact exists. It is not for noth­ing that from the very begin­ning the dis­ease was char­ac­ter­ized by the appear­ance of neu­ro­log­i­cal symp­toms, rang­ing from the loss of taste and smell sen­sa­tions. Those who have had COVID-19 also note dete­ri­o­ra­tion in mem­o­ry, hear­ing, vision, cog­ni­tive decline, dif­fi­cul­ty con­cen­trat­ing, and even increased aggres­sive­ness in behav­ior. Accord­ing to var­i­ous experts, from 30 to 80% of those who have been ill for a long time may suf­fer from sleep dis­or­ders. This phe­nom­e­non has received an unof­fi­cial name — COVID-som­nia, or “covid-asso­ci­at­ed insom­nia” (CAB).

It man­i­fests itself in dif­fer­ent ways.

Dif­fi­cul­ties with falling asleep are pos­si­ble, when you real­ly want to sleep, but you can’t fall asleep. And when sleep comes, it turns out to be super­fi­cial and shal­low, eas­i­ly inter­rupt­ed, after which it is impos­si­ble to fall asleep again. It takes a lot of time and effort to fall asleep again, so in the morn­ing a per­son does not feel rest­ed at all.

Expe­ri­enced breath­ing prob­lems do not pass with­out a trace: it may seem to espe­cial­ly impres­sion­able peo­ple that there is not enough air, that they are suf­fo­cat­ing. This fear, as well as the asso­ci­at­ed fear of suf­fo­cat­ing in a dream due to the fact that the lungs stop work­ing, do not allow you to fall asleep. Peo­ple often com­plain that after covid, the habit of con­stant­ly con­trol­ling their breath­ing has devel­oped, and now they are afraid that auto­mat­ic breath­ing, such as before the ill­ness, no longer “works”.

There are also com­plete­ly oppo­site com­plaints — to irre­sistible day­time sleepi­ness. When a per­son lit­er­al­ly turns off, and can fall asleep on the go, dur­ing a con­ver­sa­tion or work.

It’s not just covid?

The temp­ta­tion to write every­thing off as a “post-COVID loop” is present. More­over, the virus real­ly dam­ages both nerve cells and blood ves­sels, includ­ing those sup­ply­ing blood to the “cen­tral con­trol organ” — the brain.

But in the course of research it became clear that not every­thing is so sim­ple.

Those who did not get sick with covid began to com­plain more often about the occur­rence of prob­lems with sleep, that is, their body did not encounter the coro­n­avirus, and it could not dam­age the ner­vous sys­tem.

Obser­va­tions of those who have recov­ered have also shown anoth­er point: insom­nia often occurs against the back­ground of stress caused both by one’s own ill­ness and by the pan­dem­ic as a whole. There is also such a thing that a per­son lit­er­al­ly cre­ates prob­lems for him­self — knock­ing down his own regime, not fol­low­ing the prin­ci­ples of a healthy lifestyle.

Some experts also express the opin­ion that not every­thing should be attrib­uted to the con­se­quences of the coro­n­avirus. In par­tic­u­lar, the well-known doc­tor Myas­nikov, answer­ing a ques­tion about post-covid insom­nia of one of the view­ers of his pro­gram, advised her not to look for a som­nol­o­gist, but to check the func­tion­ing of the thy­roid gland, to make sure that sleep is not hin­dered by apnea, that is, the most com­mon snor­ing. And also to estab­lish a health­i­er lifestyle, not to eat at night and move more.

Accord­ing to psy­chol­o­gist Jen­nifer Mar­tin from the USA, CAB can also be caused by stress fac­tors: anx­i­ety for loved ones, fear of a pan­dem­ic and its con­se­quences, finan­cial prob­lems, and even quar­an­tine due to ill­ness. More­over, most often, accord­ing to Amer­i­can sci­en­tists, men of the most social­ly active age, 35–44 years old, suf­fer from insom­nia. J. Mar­tin also admits that changes in lifestyle can have a neg­a­tive impact on sleep: peo­ple spend more time at home, at the TV and com­put­er, with a smart­phone in their hands, more time than before. Because of this, the reg­i­men can be dis­turbed — they go to bed lat­er, get up at dif­fer­ent times, which “con­fus­es” the body and dis­rupts nat­ur­al cir­ca­di­an rhythms.

Dr. Mar­t­in’s advice is sim­i­lar to Dr. Myas­nikov’s: main­tain a con­sis­tent dai­ly rou­tine, try to sleep at least 7 hours a day, go to bed and get up at the same time, spend less time on the Inter­net and turn off all gad­gets and TV 30 min­utes before going to bed . It is help­ful to take a warm bath or show­er.

Pro­fes­sor Daniel Beisse, psy­chi­a­trist

In the spring of 2021, we con­duct­ed a sur­vey among Amer­i­can adults. It turned out that dur­ing the pan­dem­ic, more than half of the respon­dents expe­ri­enced dif­fi­cul­ty falling asleep, as well as with the con­ti­nu­ity and dura­tion of sleep. In many cas­es, these com­plaints were also asso­ci­at­ed with day­time sleepi­ness, which is under­stand­able: the body seeks to make up for the lack of night sleep.

How­ev­er, in our opin­ion, sleep prob­lems stem not only and not so much from the trans­ferred COVID-19, and may be asso­ci­at­ed with med­ical prob­lems such as obe­si­ty, dia­betes, high blood pres­sure. Side effects of cer­tain med­ica­tions are also pos­si­ble. Sub­stance abuse should also be tak­en into account, as well as depres­sion, the preva­lence of which has recent­ly been wor­ri­some.​

How to deal with insomnia?

How to deal with insomnia?

This is what doc­tors offer, in addi­tion to main­tain­ing a ratio­nal lifestyle, prop­er nutri­tion and suf­fi­cient phys­i­cal activ­i­ty.

Eli Aung, psy­chi­a­trist, mem­ber of the Amer­i­can Psy­chi­atric Asso­ci­a­tion

Often the cause of insom­nia is “antic­i­pa­to­ry anx­i­ety,” the wor­ry that you may not be able to fall asleep again. It is not easy to deal with this prob­lem: the more you dri­ve this thought away from you, the more insis­tent­ly it returns, dis­turb­ing you more and more.

And even if you still man­age to fall asleep, anx­i­ety can not go any­where, and cause inter­rup­tion of sleep. I rec­om­mend to my patients that they stop focus­ing on the prob­lems of falling asleep and con­cen­trate on being awake. That is, lie down in bed, close your eyes, and try not to fall asleep. When the mind is dis­tract­ed from wor­ry­ing about how to fall asleep, the body begins to do what it needs: sleep.

Vivek Jain, direc­tor of the Cen­ter for Sleep Dis­or­ders at The George Wash­ing­ton Uni­ver­si­ty

If you’re strug­gling with insom­nia, try not to focus too much on mak­ing sure you get a cer­tain num­ber of hours of sleep each day, or stick­ing to your cho­sen dai­ly rou­tine to the minute. Loop­ing like this only increas­es stress lev­els and exac­er­bates the prob­lem. Just do things that can help you fall asleep: exer­cise, don’t have din­ner late at night (the best time to eat is 2 hours before bed­time), reduce the amount of time spent in front of a com­put­er screen or with a phone in hand.

Focus on what you can con­trol and try to do it. And what is impos­si­ble to con­trol — a pan­dem­ic, an eco­nom­ic cri­sis, bad weath­er — try to be detached. It may not be easy, but if it works, many sleep prob­lems will dis­ap­pear by them­selves.​

But what doc­tors strong­ly dis­cour­age is alco­hol, which many drink in the evening to “relax and fall asleep.” The fact is that even a small dose of alco­hol con­sumed in the evening, short­ly before bed­time, dis­rupts the pro­duc­tion of mela­tonin even in those who do not com­plain of insom­nia. Accord­ing to the Amer­i­can Acad­e­my of Sleep Med­i­cine, 68% of Amer­i­can adults expe­ri­ence sleep prob­lems due to the habit of drink­ing before bed. This leads to chron­ic fatigue, increased irri­tabil­i­ty, and starts a vicious cycle.

Neu­rol­o­gist-som­nol­o­gist Ele­na Tsare­va advis­es to adopt the “rule of 15 min­utes”, that is, not to stay in bed with­out sleep for more than this time. This is nec­es­sary to devel­op the con­nec­tion “bed — falling asleep and sleep.” If you just often lie in bed with­out sleep, then anoth­er, unde­sir­able con­nec­tion may form: “bed — insom­nia.” To form the nec­es­sary con­nec­tion, it is bet­ter to approach the bed with a feel­ing of drowsi­ness and readi­ness to fall asleep as soon as the head touch­es the pil­low. And, of course, it is nec­es­sary to exclude watch­ing tele­vi­sion pro­grams in bed, make the bed­room a for­bid­den ter­ri­to­ry for using smart­phones.

Oth­er experts agree with this. It is espe­cial­ly not rec­om­mend­ed to watch the news feed before going to bed, which inevitably becomes a source of anx­i­ety and stress.

You might also like the arti­cle How to sleep with­out insom­nia med­ica­tion?

By Yraa

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