Sleep deficiency and health: provocation of depression, decreased immunity, disease

By Yraa #ability, #able, #accordingly, #achieve, #activated, #activities, #activity, #add, #affect, #affects, #against, #air, #although, #amount, #apnea, #appears, #around, #asleep, #associated, #athletes, #athletic, #average, #background, #basic, #been, #believe, #between, #blood, #Body, #boost, #both, #cardiovascular, #cardiovascular disease, #cause, #cell, #children, #chronic, #Cleaning, #cold, #communication, #completely, #complex, #complications, #concentration, #condition, #considered, #constant, #daily, #damage, #daytime, #decrease, #decreased, #deficiency, #definitely, #depression, #developed, #developing, #diabetes, #diagnosed, #difficult, #difficulty, #disease, #disorders, #doing, #dream, #due, #duration, #effect, #efficiency, #emotional, #enough, #especially, #every, #example, #excess, #exercising, #experience, #experts, #fact, #factor, #falling, #form, #forward, #fresh, #function, #functions, #gain, #general, #gets, #ghrelin, #given, #glucose, #goes, #greater, #grip, #group, #he, #health, #Healthy, #heart, #here, #higher, #however, #human, #immune, #immunity, #impact, #increased, #increases, #increasing, #inflammation, #inflammatory, #information, #insomnia, #insufficient, #journal, #know, #known, #lack, #lead, #leading, #leads, #least, #leaves, #leptin, #less, #levels, #likelihood, #likely, #lives, #lot, #lower, #maintain, #mechanism, #mental, #modern, #mood, #much, #myths, #naturally, #needs, #negatively, #nervous, #night, #nightmares, #normally, #noticeable, #nutrition, #obesity, #off, #older, #operation, #others, #overall, #pathology, #people, #performing, #physical, #physical activity, #place, #plasma, #play, #poor, #population, #problems, #processes, #Products, #proper, #properly, #proven, #provocation, #published, #put, #quality, #reactions, #reason, #received, #recommend, #recovery, #Reduce, #reduced, #reduces, #reducing, #regimen, #regularly, #relationship, #research, #researchers, #respectively, #response, #rest, #result, #results, #risk, #role, #scientists, #self, #serious, #several, #show, #shown, #significantly, #signs, #simultaneously, #six, #sleep, #Sleeping, #sleeps, #social, #some, #speed, #spend, #spends, #standard, #stay, #still, #strength, #strips, #studies, #study, #suffer, #suffering, #sure, #system, #systematically, #systems, #take, #tend, #therefore, #things, #third, #those, #throughout, #times, #today, #turn, #type, #various, #vessels, #vital, #walking, #was, #weight, #while, #who, #why, #will, #Women, #works, #world

Mod­ern life leaves its mark on most peo­ple and can neg­a­tive­ly affect health. Con­stant stress, poor nutri­tion, inac­tiv­i­ty — all this seri­ous­ly affects the body. And if you add here poor sleep, chron­ic lack of sleep or insom­nia, the prob­lem is exac­er­bat­ed. The brain works in mul­ti­task­ing mode through­out the day, simul­ta­ne­ous­ly con­trol­ling all the process­es in the body, remem­ber­ing infor­ma­tion, gen­er­at­ing speech. If he is not giv­en prop­er rest, there is a decrease in effi­cien­cy, headache and depres­sion. But not only does the brain suf­fer from lack of sleep, the body can also low­er immu­ni­ty, form excess weight or increase pres­sure in response to per­sis­tent sleep prob­lems. Why is sleep so impor­tant, why do you need to sleep every day?

A third of life is in a dream: why?

As adults, peo­ple on aver­age spend about a third of their lives sleep­ing. At least this is the amount of sleep that experts rec­om­mend for peo­ple to stay healthy. And accord­ing­ly, a third of the day is 8 hours, the stan­dard rec­om­men­da­tion for the dura­tion of sleep in order to get enough sleep and main­tain per­for­mance. But does every­one know why such rec­om­men­da­tions?

Despite the fact that sleep is one of the basic, vital func­tions of the body, and this is what all peo­ple do, as well as ani­mals with com­plex ner­vous sys­tems, there is still a veil of mys­tery and a lot of myths around the mech­a­nisms and the­o­ries of sleep. Sci­en­tists are still not entire­ly sure why peo­ple sleep (and exact­ly a third of the day), how exact­ly this mech­a­nism devel­oped. How­ev­er, today many hypothe­ses have been put for­ward to explain why sleep is so impor­tant for health and how it affects the human brain and body.

Brain function: the impact of sleep

Although the body goes to sleep, the brain does not com­plete­ly turn off and does not sleep. How­ev­er, dur­ing sleep, its mode of oper­a­tion dif­fers sig­nif­i­cant­ly from day­time. The infor­ma­tion received dur­ing the day is ana­lyzed and “laid out into strips”, self-clean­ing of meta­bol­ic prod­ucts and a “reboot” of the sys­tem take place: and a change of activ­i­ty is also a rest. There­fore, with­out enough sleep, the brain will not be able to func­tion prop­er­ly. Lack of sleep leads to prob­lems with con­cen­tra­tion, per­for­mance, cog­ni­tion, mem­o­ry, and brain pro­duc­tiv­i­ty. How­ev­er, when a per­son gets enough sleep reg­u­lar­ly, stud­ies show that both chil­dren and adults expe­ri­ence improved mem­o­ry and prob­lem-solv­ing skills.

Cardiovascular risk

The effect of con­stant lack of sleep on the health of the heart and the con­di­tion of blood ves­sels is known. Peo­ple who sleep less than 7 hours a night are at much greater risk of car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease (such as stroke, coro­nary heart dis­ease) than those who get 7 to 8 hours of ade­quate sleep. In addi­tion, peo­ple suf­fer­ing from insom­nia nat­u­ral­ly have 15–20% high­er blood pres­sure, which increas­es the risk of com­pli­ca­tions.

depression, emotionality

depression, emotionality

It has been proven that insom­nia and depres­sion are linked. Often, sleep prob­lems are con­sid­ered the result of depres­sion, although many researchers tend to believe an inverse rela­tion­ship. Over the course of many years of research, sci­en­tists have iden­ti­fied sev­er­al men­tal health prob­lems, includ­ing depres­sion, that have been strong­ly asso­ci­at­ed with inad­e­quate sleep and sleep dis­or­ders (insom­nia, awak­en­ings at night, night­mares). One exam­ple of a pathol­o­gy that neg­a­tive­ly affects over­all health and mood is sleep apnea, which is asso­ci­at­ed with poor sleep. Peo­ple with this syn­drome expe­ri­ence depres­sion much more often than those who sleep nor­mal­ly. Over­all, about 90% of peo­ple diag­nosed with depres­sion also expe­ri­ence prob­lems with sleep qual­i­ty, includ­ing dif­fi­cul­ty falling asleep, night­time awak­en­ings, and shal­low sleep.

Some researchers report that insuf­fi­cient sleep reduces the abil­i­ty to rec­og­nize oth­er peo­ple’s impor­tant emo­tion­al cues, includ­ing hap­pi­ness and anger. This fac­tor can make it dif­fi­cult to social­ly inter­act with oth­ers, lead­ing to com­mu­ni­ca­tion prob­lems and social iso­la­tion.

Inflammation and immune function

Against the back­ground of chron­ic lack of sleep, the immune sys­tem suf­fers sig­nif­i­cant­ly. Peo­ple who sys­tem­at­i­cal­ly lack sleep or suf­fer from insom­nia are 30% more like­ly to get ARVI. One of the best things you can do to boost your immu­ni­ty against a cold or flu is to get enough sleep. In addi­tion, the activ­i­ty of the immune sys­tem is also impor­tant in the sup­pres­sion of inflam­ma­tion, includ­ing sys­temic inflam­ma­tion. Sys­temic inflam­ma­tion has been shown to play a crit­i­cal role in many seri­ous health prob­lems, rang­ing from heart dis­ease to asth­ma, arthri­tis, inflam­ma­to­ry bow­el dis­ease and dia­betes. So it’s impor­tant to know that poor sleep can cause signs of inflam­ma­tion and cell dam­age. One exam­ple is the link between poor sleep and inflam­ma­to­ry bow­el dis­ease, which has been shown in a num­ber of stud­ies pub­lished in the World Jour­nal of Gas­troen­terol­o­gy and Gas­troen­terol­o­gy & Hepa­tol­ogy.

Physical performance and health

Physical performance and health

Insuf­fi­cient sleep can affect health by reduc­ing phys­i­cal activ­i­ty. If a per­son spends a lot of time in the fresh air, doing dai­ly activ­i­ties or exer­cis­ing, he def­i­nite­ly needs sleep to achieve the best results. For exam­ple, in a study in a group of old­er women, poor sleep was asso­ci­at­ed with greater dif­fi­cul­ty per­form­ing dai­ly activ­i­ties, walk­ing, and decreased grip strength. In addi­tion, in peo­ple with a lack of sleep, their over­all health suf­fers. Peo­ple who are usu­al­ly active, such as those who are active in var­i­ous sports, also have bet­ter speed, recov­ery times. But if they do not sleep well, then the results are dras­ti­cal­ly reduced. This is espe­cial­ly notice­able in ath­letes, in whom vio­la­tions of the reg­i­men and sleep time reduce ath­let­ic per­for­mance.

Type 2 Diabetes Risk

If a per­son over 40 sleeps less than six hours a night, then they have an increased risk of devel­op­ing type 2 dia­betes. Insuf­fi­cient sleep gen­er­al­ly neg­a­tive­ly impacts blood glu­cose lev­els in the gen­er­al pop­u­la­tion. Due to stress due to lack of sleep, mech­a­nisms for increas­ing plas­ma glu­cose are acti­vat­ed, which pre­dis­pos­es to dia­betes. This neg­a­tive­ly affects health.

In addi­tion, the weight also changes. Stud­ies have shown that insuf­fi­cient sleep is asso­ci­at­ed with the like­li­hood of obe­si­ty in chil­dren and adults by 89 and 55%, respec­tive­ly. One rea­son for this rela­tion­ship appears to be relat­ed to hor­mones. When a per­son does not get enough sleep, the work of appetite hor­mones is dis­rupt­ed. For exam­ple, lev­els of the appetite stim­u­lant ghre­lin increase while lev­els of the appetite sup­pres­sant lep­tin decrease. These reac­tions can lead to weight gain.

By Yraa

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