Sleepwalking, Snoring, Talking: What Sleep Habits Say About Your Health

By Yraa #activities, #acute, #adding, #adversely, #aesthetic, #affect, #affects, #age, #almost, #although, #any, #apnea, #around, #asleep, #associated, #attack, #awake, #awakening, #bed, #behavior, #being, #believed, #between, #blood, #Body, #breath, #breathing, #cases, #cause, #causes, #cavity, #cells, #certain, #chair, #child, #children, #chronic, #comes, #common, #complain, #complex, #concentration, #constant, #constantly, #continue, #corners, #could, #daily, #daytime, #develop, #developing, #diabetes, #diet, #different, #discomfort, #disease, #diseases, #disorder, #disorders, #doing, #doubt, #down, #dramatically, #due, #each, #effect, #effective, #eight, #eliminate, #else, #emotional, #emotions, #especially, #even, #every, #experts, #fact, #falling, #family, #fatigue, #fear, #followed, #forced, #general, #gently, #give, #habit, #habits, #he, #health, #heart, #help, #high, #him, #himself, #his, #history, #house, #however, #impact, #impairment, #increases, #interfere, #iron, #isolated, #just, #know, #lack, #last, #lead, #leading, #leaving, #leg, #legs, #limb, #line, #long, #look, #may, #medications, #minute, #mouth, #move, #movements, #moving, #negative, #negatively, #night, #nightmares, #normal, #nothing, #now, #occur, #occurs, #open, #oral, #others, #overall, #overload, #oxygen, #parents, #patients, #people, #periods, #phases, #physical, #pillow, #presence, #previously, #problems, #prone, #putting, #reality, #repeating, #respiratory, #rest, #restless, #result, #return, #rhythmic, #risk, #role, #room, #rule, #safety, #say, #scientists, #seconds, #seek, #separate, #serious, #sharp, #shoulder, #show, #sign, #simply, #situation, #sleep, #Sleeping, #sleeps, #snoring, #some, #something, #sometimes, #specialist, #stop, #suffer, #supply, #symptom, #taking, #talk, #ten, #those, #thought, #tissue, #treated, #treatment, #treatments, #try, #two, #typical, #understand, #unpleasant, #very, #wake, #waking, #walk, #was, #whether, #while, #who, #will, #worry, #worth

Many peo­ple com­plain to the doc­tor about snor­ing dur­ing night or day­time sleep, empha­siz­ing the fact that many rel­a­tives snore in the fam­i­ly. In addi­tion, some peo­ple talk in their sleep, smack their lips, sniff or sali­vate, some patients walk around the house with­out remem­ber­ing it. It is believed that many sleep habits and behav­iors can adverse­ly affect health. So, snor­ing can be a man­i­fes­ta­tion of sleep apnea with res­pi­ra­to­ry arrest, and leg jerk­ing can be a sign of stress.

Night snoring: the biggest problem

Night snoring: the biggest problem

Often peo­ple suf­fer from spouse snor­ing, mov­ing to a sep­a­rate room to final­ly sleep. But this is not the only prob­lem for those who have noc­tur­nal snor­ing. With a long his­to­ry of such a sleep dis­or­der, the risk of devel­op­ing high blood pres­sure, dia­betes, heart dis­ease, chron­ic headaches, mem­o­ry impair­ment and even erec­tile dys­func­tion increas­es dra­mat­i­cal­ly.

Patients who suf­fer from snor­ing often com­plain to their doc­tor about day­time sleepi­ness and lack of con­cen­tra­tion, despite the fact that they get eight to ten hours of sleep each night. It is impor­tant to under­stand that snor­ing is often a symp­tom of a very seri­ous, com­mon dis­or­der: sleep apnea, which often caus­es breath­ing to stop for up to 30 sec­onds or more.

Respiratory disorders, tissue hypoxia

Snor­ing was pre­vi­ous­ly thought to be an unpleas­ant effect that dis­rupts the sleep of oth­ers, but sci­en­tists now know that it is a poten­tial­ly neg­a­tive symp­tom that affects the health of the snor­er him­self. Per­sis­tent night­time snor­ing should be a cause for con­cern, espe­cial­ly if breath­ing is inter­rupt­ed fol­lowed by a sharp, noisy breath. This is a typ­i­cal pic­ture of sleep apnea, lead­ing to tis­sue hypox­ia, includ­ing the brain. If tis­sue res­pi­ra­tion (oxy­gen sup­ply to the cells) suf­fers, this pro­vokes a chain of meta­bol­ic changes that increase the risk of seri­ous dis­eases.

Sleep habits and their role

Sleep habits and their role

In the case of many oth­er night­time habits, the line between just being weird and tru­ly dis­turb­ing usu­al­ly comes down to how com­mon and detri­men­tal the behav­ior is, whether it is due to some­thing else, such as a night­mare. There are habits that do not inter­fere with nor­mal rest, then there is noth­ing to wor­ry about. Oth­er sleep habits, repeat­ing almost every night, can lead to chron­ic lack of sleep, fatigue and health prob­lems, in which case you need to look for their cause and imme­di­ate­ly elim­i­nate it.

When in doubt, seek the help of a sleep spe­cial­ist who can help diag­nose or rule out sleep prob­lems. If it is a sleep dis­or­der, then there are effec­tive treat­ments that are impor­tant to use, as the lack of treat­ment can impair dai­ly life. So, in the case of sleep apnea, its pres­ence can increase the risk of heart attack, stroke and fatal acci­dents.

Drooling on pillow while sleeping

If the patient wakes up with a pud­dle on the pil­low or notices a wet spot on the shoul­der after tak­ing a nap in the chair, do not wor­ry. This is not a dan­ger­ous habit, although not the most aes­thet­ic. Sali­va is pro­duced con­tin­u­ous­ly in the oral cav­i­ty, some­times a per­son sleeps with his mouth open, so some of the sali­va flows from the cor­ner of the mouth.

Sleepwalking

Some peo­ple get up and walk around in their sleep, and this is usu­al­ly not alarm­ing. If a per­son is prone to sleep­walk­ing, it is worth tak­ing safe­ty pre­cau­tions by pro­tect­ing them from dan­ger­ous objects such as sharp cor­ners or open win­dows that could be mis­tak­en for doors. There are reports of peo­ple doing very com­plex activ­i­ties while sleep­ing, includ­ing leav­ing the house and dri­ving some­where and then wak­ing up with no mem­o­ry of what was hap­pen­ing.

You should not try to wake the per­son, he may be dis­ori­ent­ed, and some­times may show aggres­sion or fear. It is impor­tant to sim­ply gen­tly return the per­son to bed, and his sleep will con­tin­ue.

Sleeping and its impact on health

Many peo­ple hum, make iso­lat­ed sounds, or even talk in phras­es or sen­tences in their sleep. Experts say that sleep talk­ing is gen­er­al­ly harm­less, does not affect health, and is not a symp­tom of any dis­or­der. How­ev­er, if such peri­ods of talk­ing dis­turb sleep and do not give rest, it is worth dis­cussing the sit­u­a­tion with a doc­tor.

Screams in my sleep

Screams in my sleep

Awak­en­ing from uncon­trol­lable screams is more typ­i­cal for chil­dren, espe­cial­ly those of school age, who are impres­sion­able and emo­tion­al. Often this is a prob­lem for par­ents who are forced to get up to the bed of the child and soothe him by putting him back to bed. Often, night­time screams are asso­ci­at­ed with night­mares that chil­dren per­ceive as real­i­ty. In many cas­es, they are the result of an over­abun­dance of emo­tions or acute stress, last no more than one or two nights, and do not affect over­all health.

If night­mares and awak­en­ings with screams occur in adults, this may be a sign of con­stant emo­tion­al over­load, chron­ic stress, or psy­cho-emo­tion­al dis­or­ders. If they con­stant­ly haunt the patient, they can devel­op into a pho­bic neu­ro­sis, fear of falling asleep and recur­ring night­mares. This also neg­a­tive­ly affects phys­i­cal health.

twitch

Con­stant twitch­es or jerky move­ments dur­ing sleep are con­tro­ver­sial among experts, while one or two twitch­es while falling asleep are nor­mal because the brain and body do not move in syn­chrony with dif­fer­ent phas­es of sleep. But leg twitch­es, like rhyth­mic leg move­ments last­ing up to a minute, may be asso­ci­at­ed with sleep apnea. Sleep apnea treat­ment often elim­i­nates these peri­od­ic limb move­ments.

ai generated, nature, woman
realism, odalisque, woman
child, baby, cute
ai generated, woman, bed
bed, bedroom, room

If the twitch­ing or dis­com­fort in the legs occurs when a per­son is awake and sub­sides when they get up, it may be rest­less legs syn­drome, which is usu­al­ly treat­ed by adding iron to the diet or tak­ing cer­tain med­ica­tions. In gen­er­al, such move­ments do not affect health.

By Yraa

Leave a Reply