When is the best time to get up: the principles of the biological clock

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When is the best time to get up is a ques­tion that wor­ries many. In the real­i­ties of mod­ern life, a per­son is faced with a lack of time. The only tem­po­rary piece from which it turns out to be torn off is sleep. How­ev­er, the body will not thank you for such sav­ings.

The biological clock

What time to get up depends on the bio­log­i­cal clock of a par­tic­u­lar per­son.

The bio­log­i­cal clock is the alter­na­tion of sleep and wake­ful­ness. At a cer­tain time of the day, the nerve cells of the body become active, then the peri­od of extinc­tion of activ­i­ty begins. It aris­es by itself with­out the inter­ven­tion of exter­nal cir­cum­stances. In con­nec­tion with these fea­tures of the body, three human chrono­types are dis­tin­guished:

    Larks. These are people who easily get up early in the morning and go to bed early in the evening. This type easily adapts to the work schedule from 8–17 hours.
    Owls. Representatives of this chronotype go to bed late and get up late. It is quite difficult for them to adapt to the normal routine of the day. They are ideal for second shift work.
    Pigeons. These are those who easily get up and lie down at any time convenient for them.

The incon­sis­ten­cy of the life sched­ule with the bio­log­i­cal rhythm neg­a­tive­ly affects the activ­i­ty and mood. Even a full sleep for 8 hours does not save.

The bio­log­i­cal clock does not arise by itself. The appear­ance of the rhythm of dai­ly activ­i­ty is influ­enced by sev­er­al fac­tors.

    Heredity. This factor is the hardest to deal with. If “owl” or “lark” is in your DNA, then the best way to save your nerves and health is to find a job whose schedule matches your chronotype.
    Age. Young people sleep much more than older people. Getting up early for a person of age is a common thing.
    Habit. Sometimes the “Owl” type develops due to lifestyle. The day passes in turmoil, and in the evening an adult takes time for himself. Reading books, watching a movie, talking with friends are exciting things that can end deep after midnight. If you go to work in the morning, then the result is a whole day of bad mood due to lack of sleep and not feeling very well. In this case, you need to reconsider the daily routine.
    Season. Summer requires less sleep than winter. The biological clock adjusts to the length of daylight hours.
    Being in a different time zone. On a business trip or vacation, the body lives according to its usual schedule, and how much time it takes on a mechanical watch does not interest it.

To adjust your sleep and wake sched­ule to your sched­ule, you need to make it a habit to wake up and fall asleep at the same time. The main thing is not to let your­self relax dur­ing the week­end. Soon­er or lat­er, your bio­log­i­cal clock will start to match your lifestyle.

How to fall asleep and wake up properly

How to fall asleep and wake up properly

The prob­lem of many is “I go to bed on time, but I can’t fall asleep.” In order for sleep to come faster, you need to pay atten­tion to some fac­tors:

    Time to sleep. Going to bed should be at the same time.
    A place to sleep. For a night’s rest, take a special room. The bed should be comfortable and spacious. Turn off all unnecessary appliances, ensure silence.
    Airing the room before going to bed. Coolness is the best option for falling asleep.
    The presence of thick curtains. The penetration of light interferes with sleep.
    No gadgets before bed. A couple of hours before bedtime, turn off the TV, computer, and put your phone away. It is better to spend this time walking or playing with children.
    Dinner should not be late. If you want to eat, you can afford something light.
    Making plans for the next day before bed is a bad idea. The brain should calm down, and not remember what has not been done yet.

If you can’t fall asleep for a long time, you don’t need to be ner­vous and force your­self to sleep. You need to get up and do some­thing qui­et, monot­o­nous and bor­ing. Rou­tine work will cause a desire to fall asleep quick­ly.

Get­ting up is just as impor­tant as falling asleep. Some­times the alarm clock pulls out of a sweet dream with a deaf­en­ing sound, and then it takes some time to recov­er.

To pre­vent this from hap­pen­ing, it is bet­ter to put a beau­ti­ful calm melody on the alarm clock. She will gen­tly wake you up and cheer you up.

How much sleep do you need

It is gen­er­al­ly accept­ed that the ide­al dura­tion of sleep is 7–8 hours. But some of this time is not enough, while for oth­ers 6 hours is enough. The peri­od of sleep should be such that the body feels alert and healthy. How­ev­er, a full sleep of less than six hours will not restore strength.

When is the best time to get up? If we talk about time, then the answer to this ques­tion does not exist. You need to focus on your own body. You need to get up when you get enough sleep. If you need 7 hours for a good rest, then when you fall asleep at 23.00, you need to get up at 6 in the morn­ing. The main thing is to com­bine the bio­log­i­cal clock with the dai­ly rou­tine and remem­ber that prop­er sleep is health.

By Yraa

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