Where healthy sleep has gone: the role of drugs, temperature and gadgets as a rest

By Yraa #ability, #accompanied, #according, #actions, #activity, #affect, #affects, #afternoon, #air, #alarm, #alcohol, #allocate, #almost, #antidepressants, #asleep, #associated, #attention, #avoid, #avoiding, #bath, #bed, #bedtime, #been, #being, #blood, #blue, #Body, #caffeine, #cannot, #cardiovascular, #cardiovascular disease, #carry, #cause, #causes, #certain, #chronic, #clock, #coffee, #combat, #comfort, #compliance, #computer, #concentration, #constantly, #consume, #consumption, #convenience, #cool, #cup, #dark, #deep, #depression, #deprivation, #devices, #diabetes, #did, #disease, #dreams, #drink, #drinks, #drowsiness, #drugs,, #dryness, #due, #duration, #each, #earlier, #eating, #effects, #eight, #electronic, #emotional, #energy, #enough, #environment, #especially, #even, #evening, #everything, #excessive, #experience, #experiences, #Eye, #fact, #fall, #falling, #fast, #fatigue, #feels, #follows, #food, #forget, #found, #fully, #function, #gadgets, #getting, #go, #going, #Good, #gradually, #half, #health, #Healthy, #heart, #herbal, #high, #higher, #himself, #his, #hot, #household, #human, #impairment, #improve, #improving, #inflammation, #information, #injuries, #insomnia, #instead, #interfere, #just, #keep, #know, #late, #later, #lead, #leads, #learning, #length, #less, #let, #level, #levels, #Light, #likely, #long, #lose, #lot, #love, #lowest, #lying, #maintain, #maintaining, #may, #medications, #melatonin, #mind, #minutes, #mobile, #movements, #nature, #needs, #negatively, #nervous, #night, #nothing, #numbers, #obesity, #off, #old, #organize, #oxygen, #patients, #people, #per, #pets, #phase, #plays, #poor, #prepare, #preventing, #problems, #process, #production, #proven, #put, #quality, #quite, #rapid, #rather, #reason, #recommended, #Reduce, #reduced, #regime, #relaxation, #relaxing, #rem, #remove, #research, #rest, #restless, #result, #rhythms, #rid, #risk, #role, #room, #scientists, #seem, #serious, #set, #short, #shown, #shows, #side, #signals, #significant, #simple, #simply, #sitting, #six, #sleep, #Sleeping, #small, #smoking, #social, #sometimes, #soundly, #spend, #stage, #start, #study, #sufficient, #suppress, #sure, #system, #t, #take, #takes, #tea, #temperature, #term, #themselves, #therefore, #thinking, #those, #three, #times, #too, #total, #turn, #two, #using, #violation, #vital, #wake, #warm, #watch, #were, #where, #while, #who, #whole, #why, #will

Ade­quate and high-qual­i­ty sleep is vital for main­tain­ing health, but most of the peo­ple do not get enough sleep to ful­ly rest the body and ner­vous sys­tem. Many peo­ple expe­ri­ence insom­nia, and two-thirds of patients with chron­ic pain have seri­ous sleep prob­lems (includ­ing as a result of side effects of med­ica­tions). But often peo­ple are not even aware that their own actions, such as sit­ting at the com­put­er or using the phone before bed, dis­turb their sleep and affect mem­o­ry. The micro­cli­mate of the bed­room plays a sig­nif­i­cant role — tem­per­a­ture, the lev­el of shad­ing and noise. Even those who know how to sleep sound­ly some­times just don’t get enough sleep. Peo­ple due to work and house­hold chores force them­selves to go to bed lat­er and get up ear­li­er. How to get back sleep and main­tain health?

Why is sleep so important?

Peo­ple with chron­ic sleep depri­va­tion who sleep six hours or less per night are at high­er risk of viral infec­tions, obe­si­ty, dia­betes, depres­sion, car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­ease, chron­ic inflam­ma­tion and pain. In addi­tion, REM sleep is impor­tant, a stage accom­pa­nied by rapid eye move­ments and dreams. Get­ting enough sleep is crit­i­cal to improv­ing mem­o­ry, learn­ing, and emo­tion­al sta­bil­i­ty. Sleep depri­va­tion leads to rapid fatigue, reduced atten­tion and con­cen­tra­tion, and there­fore a reduced risk of acci­dents and injuries. In addi­tion, long-term and qual­i­ty sleep is impor­tant for long-term life expectan­cy.

Causes of poor sleep: drugs, stimulants

Causes of poor sleep: drugs, stimulants

Many peo­ple can improve the length and qual­i­ty of their sleep by avoid­ing cer­tain stim­u­lants and med­ica­tions. Caf­feine has a half-life of six to eight hours. This means that a per­son may have caf­feine in the blood before going to bed if you drink a cup of cof­fee not in the morn­ing, but in the late after­noon. Of course, a small cup of cof­fee at lunchtime may not be enough to dis­rupt sleep at night. But the more cof­fee a per­son drinks and the lat­er they con­sume it, the more like­ly it is to dis­rupt a night’s sleep. Eat­ing a lot before bed directs the ener­gy of the body into the process of digest­ing food, and sleep can be dis­turbed. Smok­ing can also affect sleep. Accord­ing to a 2008 study, smok­ers were shown to spend far less time in deep sleep than non-smok­ers.

Med­ica­tions can also affect sleep: exces­sive alco­hol con­sump­tion, most anti­de­pres­sants and beta-block­ers dis­rupt sleep pat­terns, espe­cial­ly they affect the fast phase of it. Odd­ly enough, sleep­ing pills also sup­press REM sleep: they have been found to reduce the time it takes to fall asleep by just 15 min­utes and increase total sleep time by just 20 min­utes. The rea­son why a per­son feels bet­ter is that sleep­ing pills affect mem­o­ry, so peo­ple sim­ply for­get that they did not sleep well.

Memory impairment and absent-mindedness

Sci­en­tists have proven that chron­ic sleep depri­va­tion neg­a­tive­ly affects brain func­tion and mem­o­ry, espe­cial­ly short-term mem­o­ry. Peo­ple who are con­stant­ly sleep deprived are more like­ly to for­get where they put their keys, lose their phones, are more dis­tract­ed dur­ing the day, and often for­get impor­tant details and rel­e­vant infor­ma­tion. Even if the dura­tion of sleep is quite suf­fi­cient, but the sleep is inter­mit­tent, super­fi­cial or rest­less, this also dis­rupts mem­o­ry and con­cen­tra­tion, the brain sim­ply can­not ful­ly rest, being dis­tract­ed by sig­nals from the body and the envi­ron­ment dur­ing such sleep.

It is no less harm­ful to car­ry with you to bed the expe­ri­ences of the past day. Many peo­ple go to bed think­ing about what they will do the next day, so the brain focus­es on prob­lems, ideas, and remem­ber­ing infor­ma­tion, rather than rest.

The role of temperature and environment

For a good sleep, you need com­fort and con­ve­nience, too high air tem­per­a­ture and its dry­ness can dis­rupt the process of falling asleep and the qual­i­ty of sleep. At night, the brain needs

oxy­gen and cool­ness to work in “rest” mode. There­fore, it is impor­tant to keep your bed­room cool and dark. The tem­per­a­ture of the human body fol­lows nature with the low­est tem­per­a­ture record­ed before dawn. Vio­la­tion of body tem­per­a­ture is asso­ci­at­ed with mela­tonin lev­els, with the low­est num­bers found dur­ing REM sleep. When it’s too hot at night, it inter­feres with sleep.

How to organize a good night’s rest

How to organize a good night's rest

Almost every­one knows how a good night’s rest can affect the activ­i­ty of the whole next day. It is impor­tant not only to allo­cate the rec­om­mend­ed 7–8 hours for a night’s rest, but also to do every­thing so that the qual­i­ty of sleep is also as high as pos­si­ble. There are a num­ber of sim­ple rec­om­men­da­tions that you can start apply­ing tonight.

Avoid elec­tron­ic devices. In the evening, turn off your mobile phone (you can use the good old alarm clock instead) and avoid TV and com­put­er screens two to three hours before bed­time. The blue flick­er­ing light from them can inter­fere with the pro­duc­tion of mela­tonin, which con­trols cir­ca­di­an rhythms. In addi­tion, these devices overex­cite the brain, pre­vent­ing it from grad­u­al­ly relax­ing in the evening.

The bed­room is only for sleep and love com­forts. You should not watch TV and com­mu­ni­cate in social net­works while lying in bed, you should not work in the bed­room. Be sure to use this room only for sleep and inti­ma­cy. You need to get rid of the TV if it is in the bed­room, remove oth­er dis­trac­tions and not let your pets sleep on the bed and in the bed­room.

mind­ful relax­ation. Take the time to unwind before bed and pre­pare your mind and body for rest. A relax­ing bath or warm show­er, a sooth­ing cup of herbal tea, or just relax­ing on the couch will set you up for sleep.

Regime com­pli­ance. It may seem tempt­ing to sleep until noon on the week­ends, but in fact, a per­son com­pli­cates every­thing for him­self, con­fus­ing his body and brain. You need to go to bed and wake up at about the same time each day. Research shows that con­sis­tent sleep and wake times may also reduce the risk of heart dis­ease.

saint teresa of calcutta, mother teresa, compassion
ai generated, child, moon
ai generated, girl, asleep
peanuts, nuts, food
boy, dream, night

Refusal of cof­fee and alco­hol. There’s noth­ing wrong with a cup of cof­fee to start your day, but caf­feine dur­ing the day can affect your abil­i­ty to fall asleep in the evening. Be sure to avoid caf­feine with food and drinks after 2:00 pm. Alco­hol can cause drowsi­ness, but this does not lead to restora­tive sleep, but to the active work of the body to com­bat tox­i­co­sis.

By Yraa

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