Why do I wake up with anxiety?

By Yraa #activities, #activity, #acute, #add, #advance, #affect, #alarm, #alert, #almost, #already, #another, #any, #anyone, #anything, #appear, #approach, #appropriate, #areas, #around, #asleep, #associated, #attack, #attacks, #attention, #awake, #awakening, #away, #bad, #bath, #bed, #bedtime, #been, #begin, #beginning, #begins, #between, #blood, #blue, #Body, #both, #bouts, #breathing, #bring, #called, #calm, #car, #cardiovascular, #cases, #cause, #causes, #characteristic, #chronic, #closed, #closer, #collected, #come, #complications, #condition, #considered, #constant, #constantly, #contact, #continue, #Control, #cortisol, #couple, #cycle, #daily, #daytime, #deal, #decreases, #deep, #deeply, #detail, #develop, #diagnosed, #did, #difficult, #disease, #diseases, #disorder, #disorders, #disruption, #distinguish, #disturbances, #doctors, #dream, #dreams, #drinking, #Drops, #drowsiness, #due, #efficiency, #emotional, #emotions, #empty, #energy, #especially, #etc, #even, #evening, #everything, #evidence, #examination, #exhale, #experience, #experiment, #Eyes, #fact, #fall, #falls, #familiar, #fatigue, #fear, #feel, #feeling, #felt, #filled, #find, #fix, #focus, #frequent, #full, #fully, #functioning, #further, #gadgets, #gastrointestinal, #general, #getting, #giving, #gland, #glands, #go, #Good, #got, #gradually, #had, #half, #hang, #happen, #happens, #he, #head, #Healthy, #healthyinfo, #heart, #heavy, #help, #Helps, #him, #his, #hormonal, #hour, #however, #include, #increased, #increases, #indicates, #inhale, #insomnia, #intensity, #internal, #international, #involved, #irritability, #isolated, #itself, #kept, #known, #lack, #lead, #leads, #least, #level, #levels, #Light, #loads, #long, #longer, #look, #loved, #m, #magic, #matter, #may, #medication, #medicine, #melatonin, #menstrual, #mental, #method, #mind, #minimum, #minutes, #moment, #moments, #moreover, #much, #muscles, #nature, #needed, #nervous, #night, #nightmares, #normally, #nothing, #off, #ones, #opportunity, #our, #part, #pathological, #pay, #peak, #people, #phases, #phenomenon, #physical, #physical activity, #physiological, #pillow, #point, #poor, #positive, #pregnancy, #prepare, #presence, #problems, #production, #provides, #put, #putting, #quality, #quickly, #rapid, #rate, #read, #reality, #really, #reason, #reasons, #recommend, #Reduce, #reduces, #relationship, #relaxation, #relaxing, #release, #relieve, #relieves, #remember, #response, #responsible, #rest, #return, #reverse, #rhythms, #rid, #right, #rise, #risk, #room, #rush, #see, #seem, #seems, #Severe, #short, #shoulders, #shown, #simply, #situation, #sleep, #Sleeping, #slow, #some, #soon, #sound, #soundly, #specialist, #specific, #spent, #stable, #stage, #stopping, #stretch, #strong, #stronger, #studies, #suffering, #surge, #symptoms, #system, #t, #take, #task, #techniques, #tense, #tension, #therefore, #things, #think, #thinking, #throughout, #thyroid, #tired, #today, #together, #tract, #treated, #true, #try, #trying, #turn, #turned, #under, #unpleasant, #USA, #used, #very, #visible, #wake, #waking, #walk, #wanted, #wants, #warm, #was, #weakness, #were, #where, #while, #who, #why, #will, #working, #workouts, #would, #yoga

“I woke up before the alarm went off with a feel­ing of inex­plic­a­ble anx­i­ety. Even before I got out of bed, I already felt deeply tired. Shoul­ders cramped with ten­sion. Fear nes­tled under tight­ly closed eye­lids. I des­per­ate­ly want­ed to bur­row deep­er under the cov­ers, close my eyes and not think about the day ahead. But even if I had the oppor­tu­ni­ty to do it, noth­ing would have hap­pened. The cycle of dis­turb­ing thoughts would have kept me awake. The day was hope­less­ly ruined again. Famil­iar sit­u­a­tion? It can hap­pen to any­one, even if at first glance he has a sta­ble, order­ly life with­out any prob­lems.

Where anx­i­ety attacks come from in the morn­ing and how to deal with them, Healthy­in­fo fig­ured out.

Anxiety after waking up

This con­di­tion is man­i­fest­ed by the fol­low­ing char­ac­ter­is­tic symp­toms that appear imme­di­ate­ly after wak­ing up:

    a feeling of anxiety, restlessness, nervous excitement;
    increased irritability, often inexplicable to itself;
    fatigue despite a night’s sleep;
    trouble concentrating, feeling empty in the head;
    general nervousness that is difficult to control;
    symptoms of a panic attack: tense muscles, increased heart rate, rapid breathing, a feeling that “blood is knocking at the temples”, etc .;
    gastrointestinal symptoms may appear.

What rea­sons can cause such an unpleas­ant con­di­tion?

Morning cortisol surge and insomnia

Morning cortisol surge and insomnia

Recent stud­ies have shown that the release of the stress hor­mone cor­ti­sol in our body is sub­ject to cir­ca­di­an rhythms. Nor­mal­ly, in a healthy per­son, the lev­el of cor­ti­sol drops to a min­i­mum at 19–20 hours. At night, it grad­u­al­ly begins to rise and the peak of its pro­duc­tion falls on the pre-morn­ing hours — this phe­nom­e­non is called the “cor­ti­sol awak­en­ing response” (cor­ti­sol awak­en­ing response, CAR).

What hap­pens in the body of a per­son suf­fer­ing from insom­nia or an anx­i­ety dis­or­der? His so-called “stress” sys­tem is con­stant­ly active — the hypo­thal­a­m­ic-pitu­itary-adren­al axis, which pro­vides the pro­duc­tion of cor­ti­sol, that is, his ner­vous sys­tem is in a state of con­stant excite­ment. It is dif­fi­cult for such peo­ple to fall asleep in the evening due to increased cor­ti­sol in the blood. Then they final­ly fall asleep, but as soon as the pres­sure of sleep weak­ens, the per­son wakes up again and can no longer sleep fur­ther, since his cor­ti­sol is again at its peak.

The CAR phe­nom­e­non is con­sid­ered one of the caus­es of pre­morn­ing and morn­ing com­pli­ca­tions of car­dio­vas­cu­lar dis­eases. Ele­vat­ed lev­els of cor­ti­sol in the blood increase blood clot­ting, which increas­es the risk of blood clots. Not sur­pris­ing­ly, strokes, heart attacks, and angi­na attacks most often devel­op between 6 am and 12 noon.

Anoth­er impor­tant fact: with a lack of sleep, the activ­i­ty of the areas of the cere­bral cor­tex that are respon­si­ble for reg­u­lat­ing emo­tions decreas­es. It also increas­es anx­i­ety in the morn­ing.

Anxiety neurosis and its triggers

This is a men­tal dis­or­der in which a per­son is almost con­stant­ly in a state of patho­log­i­cal stress, anx­i­ety and fear, and with­out a spe­cif­ic rea­son. This con­di­tion is also called gen­er­al­ized anx­i­ety dis­or­der (GAD, as it is spelled out in the Inter­na­tion­al Clas­si­fi­ca­tion of Dis­eases, ICD-10).

Anx­i­ety neu­ro­sis, despite its sys­temic nature, gen­er­al­iza­tion, can have very spe­cif­ic trig­gers: prob­lems at work, con­flicts with loved ones, fright­en­ing news, a pan­dem­ic in the yard and fear of ill­ness, etc.

In 2010, psy­chol­o­gists from Pitts­burgh (USA) ana­lyzed how rela­tion­ships with­in a mar­ried cou­ple affect sleep. The exper­i­ment involved 29 het­ero­sex­u­al cou­ples who spent the night togeth­er. It turned out that the bet­ter the rela­tion­ship with­in the cou­ple was dur­ing the day, the stronger the sleep of both part­ners was and the bet­ter they felt in the morn­ing. The reverse was also true: bad rela­tion­ships dur­ing the day wors­ened sleep and wak­ing in the morn­ing.

Trig­gers can also be phys­i­o­log­i­cal: hor­mon­al storms (dur­ing preg­nan­cy or dur­ing the men­stru­al cycle, dis­rup­tion of the thy­roid gland or adren­al glands), abnor­mal loads, both intel­lec­tu­al and phys­i­cal, chron­ic dis­eases, espe­cial­ly with a poor prog­no­sis, etc.

Any of these trig­gers, and many more, can cause sleep dis­tur­bances and severe, dis­turb­ing awak­en­ings.

Heavy drink­ing the day before can lead to acute feel­ings of anx­i­ety the next morn­ing, espe­cial­ly if the per­son has already been diag­nosed with anx­i­ety dis­or­der. Anx­i­ety is part of the hang­over syn­drome.

Sleep and Awakening Disorders in GAD

For an anx­ious char­ac­ter neu­ro­sis, the so-called para­dox­i­cal drowsi­ness: a per­son wants to sleep very much, but as soon as he touch­es the pil­low with his head, the dream dis­ap­pears, as if by mag­ic.

Oth­er sleep dis­or­ders asso­ci­at­ed with GAD include:

    Interrupted superficial sleep with frequent awakenings

Such a dream is filled with night­mares, and the awak­en­ing is incom­plete, giv­ing a feel­ing of unre­al­i­ty of what is hap­pen­ing. A per­son seems to hang between heavy dreams and real­i­ty, unable to fall asleep sound­ly or ful­ly wake up. Such sleep does not bring rest and leads to ear­ly awak­en­ing in a state of anx­ious excite­ment.

    Short nap after getting up early

A per­son con­stant­ly wakes up between 4–6 am in a state of affec­tive-emo­tion­al ten­sion with a feel­ing of anx­i­ety. He has a chance to con­tin­ue the dream if he can focus on this task. But if this did not work out right away, the dream will not be returned. Lack of sleep will add to anx­i­ety a feel­ing of lethar­gy and weak­ness, chron­ic fatigue.

    borderline stage

Psy­chi­a­trists dis­tin­guish the so-called bor­der­line stage: a per­son can get a full sleep with all its phas­es and good qual­i­ty. How­ev­er, in the morn­ing, he has dis­turb­ing doubts — did he sleep at all? It may begin to seem to him that the sleep was not strong, short, while he will not expe­ri­ence drowsi­ness through­out the day. Doc­tors point out that often this con­di­tion with dis­turb­ing awak­en­ing is asso­ci­at­ed with dis­eases of the heart, gas­troin­testi­nal tract, as well as dis­or­ders in the inti­mate sphere.

What to do before bed?

    Get rid of gadgets

Today it is one of the main caus­es of increased anx­i­ety. Alert for a mes­sage, tweet, post, let­ter, com­ment, etc. pulls a per­son out of work, rest and even sound sleep. How­ev­er, the real­ly impor­tant mes­sages rarely arrive at 2 am or 6 am. There­fore, at night, turn off the sound of all gad­gets and put them away where even the light of the screens will not be vis­i­ble to you. More­over, blue light inhibits the pro­duc­tion of mela­tonin, a hor­mone respon­si­ble for qual­i­ty sleep.

    Prepare things and clothes for the morning

Morn­ing bus­tle can even make a neu­rot­ic out of a Bud­dha. There­fore, it is bet­ter to pre­pare for it in advance. Doc­u­ments, things, clothes — every­thing should be col­lect­ed in the evening, so that in the morn­ing you can get dressed with­out think­ing and go out quick­ly.

    Relieve the stress of the day

Som­nol­o­gists and psy­chother­a­pists rec­om­mend stop­ping all intel­li­gent and dig­i­tal activ­i­ties an hour before bed­time (at least half an hour!). Relax­ing yoga pos­es, a warm bath, deep breath­ing, med­i­ta­tion — any method that relieves ner­vous ten­sion and brings a calm, sound sleep will do.

    “Relax” the mind

Relax­ing games of the mind and mem­o­ry help well: you can try to remem­ber all the known breeds of dogs or men­tal­ly walk around a well-known room. You can also remem­ber only the good moments of the day, relive them, feel them. If there are no good mem­o­ries of this day (any­thing can hap­pen!) — remem­ber in detail any oth­er pos­i­tive joy­ful moment.

What to do immediately after waking up?

What to do immediately after waking up?

    Don’t rush to gadgets

You will have time to read impor­tant work let­ters dur­ing the work­ing day, or at least clos­er to its begin­ning. Wak­ing up in the morn­ing, for­bid your­self to look at the phone and read the mail and mes­sages that appeared while you were sleep­ing. Every­thing has its time.

Breath­ing tech­niques for relax­ation and sta­bi­liza­tion of the inter­nal state have been known to mankind for a long time. Deep slow breath­ing with the diaphragm — inhale for 4 counts and exhale for 4 counts — helps to reduce anx­i­ety. This method can also be used dur­ing bouts of stress dur­ing the day.

For some, morn­ing work­outs are a good help to “return to your­self”. But not every­one has the time and ener­gy for phys­i­cal activ­i­ty in the morn­ing. There­fore, you can sim­ply stretch from the heart on the rug, allo­cat­ing your­self 10 min­utes for this. If pos­si­ble, it would be nice to take a walk before work, putting your thoughts in order.

    Accept your anxiety

Fix the moment of anx­i­ety, anx­i­ety and admit that it exists, accept the very fact of the pres­ence of such an emo­tion, with­out try­ing to dri­ve the under­stand­ing of this into the far­thest cor­ner. This reduces the inten­si­ty of the strug­gle with one’s own anx­i­ety, which, when try­ing not to pay atten­tion to it, flares up more and more.

When should you see a doctor?

You can con­tact a psy­chother­a­pist imme­di­ate­ly, as soon as dis­turb­ing awak­en­ings have ceased to be iso­lat­ed cas­es. At a min­i­mum, their pres­ence indi­cates the exis­tence of unre­solved prob­lems, and a psy­chother­a­pist can help find an approach to them.

If the men­tal dis­or­der pro­gress­es, then psy­chi­atric help and med­ica­tion may be need­ed.

Final­ly, dur­ing the exam­i­na­tion, it may turn out that the mat­ter is not “in the head” of the patient at all, but the cause of the anx­i­ety dis­or­der is a dis­ease that should be treat­ed by an appro­pri­ate spe­cial­ist.

Chron­ic insom­nia and stress sys­tem. / Bas­ta M, Chrousos GP, Vela-Bueno A, Vgontzas AN. // Sleep Med­i­cine Clin­ics. - June 2007 - 2(2)

Dai­ly life stress and the cor­ti­sol awak­en­ing response: test­ing the antic­i­pa­tion hypoth­e­sis. / Pow­ell DJ, Schlotz W. // PLOS One. - 2012 - 7(12)

Cou­ples’ night­time sleep effi­cien­cy and con­cor­dance: evi­dence for bidi­rec­tion­al asso­ci­a­tions with day­time rela­tion­ship func­tion­ing. / Hasler BP, Trox­el WM. // Psy­cho­som Med. - 2010 - 72(8)

By Yraa

Leave a Reply